Mathematical PI Open Source Font?

Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Does anyone know of an Open Source Font that includes mathematical symbols? To my dismay Mathematical Pi is Open Type and presumably won't work after this year. I need the occasional multiplication sign. Thanks!

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Community Expert ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Why won't OpenType fonts work after this year? Adobe is retiring Type 1 font suppport, not OpenType.

https://helpx.adobe.com/fonts/kb/postscript-type-1-fonts-end-of-support.html

 

~Barb

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Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Sorry, I was wrong. Mathematical Pi is a Type 1 font. So my question still stands: I need something that will work!

 

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Community Expert ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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There definitely is an OpenType version of that font, and has been for many years. It has been renamed "MathematicalPi LT Std" and is available from the foundry (in this case Linotype). It was available in the Adobe Font Folio since the early 2000s (which is where i got mine from), and combined all 6 variants into one OTF font, but now, since Adobe no longers licenses Linotype fonts, you will need to obtain it it from Linotype directly or one of its resellers. The six original variants can also be purchased separately and are encoded the same as the previous Type 1 versions, so is your best choice for updating legacy documents.

As for a free version knock off, you're on your own. They would not likely work properly in legacy documents. "Buyer" beware.

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Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Thanks!

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Community Expert ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Take a look at the Noto font family from Google Fonts. https://fonts.google.com/?query=noto

Scroll down until you find

  • Noto Sans Symbols
  • Noto Sans Symbols 2
  • Noto Sans Math

 

Noto is a font project that aims to create fonts for the world's languages and dialects, including ancient and aboriginal languages. Includes punctuation, symbols, music, and every dingbat you've ever used from other fonts.

 

Fonts are free, OpenType, and can be embedded into PDFs, EPUBs, and websites without extra licensing fees. They work seemlessly for print and digital.

 

It's an incredible resource that every designer needs to have on their computer.

 

 

Bevi Chagnon | PubCom | Designer & Technologist for Accessible Documents
| Books & Classes | Accessible InDesign | Accessible PDFs | Accessible MS Office |

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Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Many thanks!

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Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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But unfortunately, it doesn't seem to include the multiplication symbol (which is the one I need). Or division either.

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Community Expert ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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Are you sure?

Google does not show all glyphs under category Sample glyphs.

 

Instead use the input field under Styles or the Type Tester and copy the two Unicode 00D7 and 00F7 glyphs from InDesign to the "Type here to preview text field".

 

FindAndCopyGlyphsFromInDesignToGoogleFonts.PNG

 

 

You'll see the two glyphs are there:

 

NotoSansMath-TypeTester-GoogleFonts.PNG

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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Participant ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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I downloaded the font and those glyphs were not included. I'll see if I can do what you suggested.

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Community Expert ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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Hm. What Unicode code points for both glyphs did you try in InDesign?

00D7 and 00F7 ?

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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Community Expert ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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Just downloaded and installed Noto Sans Math and put the font file NotoSansMath-Regular.ttf to a Document fonts folder. Both glyphs at Unicode points 00D7 and 00F7 are available and they do work very well:

 

NotoSansMath-Unicode-00D7-00F7.PNG

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender
( Adobe Community Professional )

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Participant ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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Well it turns out the Adobe Garamond Premier font DOES have the multiplication symbol. Since that's my running text font the problem is solved. I'm afraid using glyphs is beyond my skill. Thanks for your advice.

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Community Expert ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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LATEST

Yes, common math symbols like multiplcation X and the division sign are often included on basic text fonts. But not always, and not a complete set of math symbols.

 

To help with finding glyphs in the future, here's what we teach in our accessibility classes:

 

1. Find the glyph's Unicode codepoint.

This is the unique number that designates every letter, punctuation mark, symbol, emoji, etc. across all languages. Unicode is developed and maintained by the Unicode organization and you can find their charts of all 65,000 glyphs at https://www.unicode.org/charts/

 

We also have a handy Unicode chart for sale at our online bookstore, www.pubcom.com/books but it's not free like Unicode.org's charts. Our chart narrows the selection down to 100 of the most frequently used glyphs for math, bullets, punctuation, symbols, and dingbats.

 

You can also scroll endlessly through a glyph chart in InDesign, Word, Windows Character, and Apple's Character panels and eventually find the same codepoints. Examples of Unicode codepoints:

 

2715 = Multiplication X

2716 = Heavy Multiplication X

00D7 = Multiplication Sign x

2215 = Division slash /

00F7 = Division sign

2212 = Minus sign

 

2. Locate the codepoint/glyph in InDesign's Glyph Panel.

Select the font you want to use.

Type the codepoint into the search field.

 

3. If that glyph is on that font, it will appear at the top of the matrix.

If that glyph is not on that font, the matrix will be blank. Choose a different font to check if the glyph is available on it.

 

4. Insert the glyph into your InDesign layout.

 

Unicode-Glyphs_01.png

Hope this makes it easier and less painful to get the glyph you need.

 

And thank you for being concerned about accessibility and glyphs. Not too many designers know about this so you're ahead of the pack! Keep going.

 

Bevi Chagnon | PubCom | Designer & Technologist for Accessible Documents
| Books & Classes | Accessible InDesign | Accessible PDFs | Accessible MS Office |

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Community Expert ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Hi Grundoon Groundhog,

all what Bevi said, plus one remark on the Noto or any other open source font project:

 

If you download the font files for a particular project, stick with the exact same font files in the future of that project.

Noto is in development. Make sure that you always work with the exact same version of the font files.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Participant ,
May 24, 2022 May 24, 2022

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Interesting. Thanks. I still wonder why so many of the Noto fonts for obscure alphabets are locked into Adobe programs — but the Sans Math, which might be useful, is not.

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Community Expert ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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Don't have a clue why, but wondering if it's because Math in publishing isn't a widely used. It really is a small segment of the design and publishing industry that does anything with STEM.

 

Bevi Chagnon | PubCom | Designer & Technologist for Accessible Documents
| Books & Classes | Accessible InDesign | Accessible PDFs | Accessible MS Office |

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