overflowing

New Here ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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Hello,

I'm not a designer, yet have to design something and I really can't work out how. I don't know how to look for relevant information either. Not even sure the "subject" of this post is correct.

I'm posting a picture of the desired outcome. What I need to do is have the text overflowing or something without using proper hyphenation. For example, in the picture, at the end of lines 1, 2 and 3 there is no word end really, but the word continues to the next line without hyphenation. I'm sorry for posting something in Greek, but that's all I've got at the moment.

How can I get this non-hyphenated effect?

 

276152526_685772299337715_6969927297222403443_n.jpg

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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You can turn off hyphenation by unchecking it in the options panel under Paragraph.

kevinstohlmeyer_0-1649876941985.png

 

Then change your Paragraph alignment to "Justified with last line aligned left".

kevinstohlmeyer_1-1649876962186.png

 

Kevin Stohlmeyer
Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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New Here ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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Thank you.

This way, however, the word will not be broken, as in the picture. The whole word will move to the next line, right? What I need to do is somethign like that (I did this manually): a justified paragraph where the spaces between words are all the same (I suppose), leading to the break of the final word of the line, but without a hyphen. Does it make sense? I forgot to mention it is for what we call the "colophon" of a book.

ka_d_0-1649877844981.png

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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You can always go to the Hyphenation controls and set them to the parameters you are looking for.

You can find this under the Paragraph panel menu:

kevinstohlmeyer_1-1649879594956.png

 

 

Kevin Stohlmeyer
Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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New Here ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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I think I'll just do it manually, after all. But thanks, anyway. 

All best,

K.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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You could use a GREP Find/Change to add a Discretionary Line Break character after each letter.

I think this should do it:

Find: .(?!\s)

Change: $0~k

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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You could totally it all manually. What you're coming up against is that InDesign doesn't support what you want to do. But! a much easier way would be to replace every character with that character, followed by a zero-width space.  Beacuse the rule that InDesign follows that is preventing the layout you want is "always allow a line break at a space." So, if you insert a zero-width space, it'll always break at any letter! It's what I did, that one time I had to do a boustrophedon layout in ancient Greek. 

 

Open the Find/Change window

Select the GREP tab

In the "Find" window, just put in \S (it must be a capital letter; this means "Every non-space character" in GREP)

In the "Replace" window, put in $0\x{200B}

Whack "Replace all"

 

Here's an animation showing how it works:

wrappy.gif

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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Actually, now that I see it, Peter's regex does the exact same thing. Funny, that! I didn't know that ZWSP and "Discretionary Line Break" were the exact same thing in InDesign. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 14, 2022 Apr 14, 2022

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I originally tried this with a "non-joiner" character, which is what I thought they were inntended for, but it didn't work

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