Saving InDesign booklet for prepress.

Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Now that Adobe no longer supports Acrobat 9.0, how is the best way to save printer spreads on a mac? I can save the printer spreads as a postscript file, but now I can do nothing with it as my options when distilled do not allow for it anymore. Any help would be appreciated.

 

It would seem that as a professional product where most professional users are creating files "for printers", that this would not only be a feature, but a prominant advantage of its products to the design community. (InDesign 2022)

TOPICS
Import and export , Performance , Print

Views

226

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021
Almost nobody wants printer spreads submitted. Imposition is the responsibility of the printer, not the designer. If you absolutley need to do this, you may download the PPD from my Hightail space: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/vBLxr447s0

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Almost nobody wants printer spreads submitted. Imposition is the responsibility of the printer, not the designer.

 

If you absolutley need to do this, you may download the PPD from my Hightail space: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/vBLxr447s0

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Printer required. Thank you for the link.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I agree with Peter.

 

Unless this is a small, simple 4 letter size pages on a few 11x17 sheets*, there are other issues to deal with. I don't think I would supply printer spreads for any job over 8- or 16-pages. (I would still ask the printer why they can't do it; even most quick print devices have that feature built in.) If saddle stitch binding, there is page creep to take into account, if perfect bound binding, there is page grind off to deal with. 

 

*If you are on Windows (I haven't tested it on my Mac), you can use the Print Booklet to the Adobe PDF driver if the job is a simple saddle-stitch (you can even adjust for creep). The 2-up perfect bound settings allow for different sized signatures. 

image.png

image.png

For other viewers:

Printer spreads are imposed pages in the correct order so when the job is put together in bindery, the pages appear in the right order. Reader spreads is what InDesign does--that is in the order the pages are read. 

An easy way to figure out printer spreads, is to

  • Make sure your total page count is divisible by 4.
  • Take your total page countand add one (1) to it. 
  • The pages in the printer spread should add up to that number.

For example, if you have a 16-page newsletter, the first printer spread would be 1 & 16 (adding up to 17), the next would be 15 & 2, etc. 

A 32-page newsletter would be 1 & 32 (33), 31 & 2, etc. 

David Creamer
Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Certified Professional, and Adobe Certified Expert (since 1995)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I am normally doing 48-72 page booklets. Sorry, but many printers are still requiring pdf files. (Not my rules and I have no control over it) I just don't see why there has to be a disconnect and work arounds. These are supposed to be programs for "professionals", yet through the years (and I have many under my belt) we have continued to have to "make it work." If print booklet is going to set the files up, Adobe should allow their other poducts to work hand in hand with the process and support the professional community that supports them. A simple work flow process is all I am looking for.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

>>but many printers are still requiring pdf files

Correct--but single-page PDFs. 

The printer actually requested imposed PDFs for a 72-page book? 

 

You build in reader spreads in InDesign. You export to single-page PDFs. The printer imposes the PDF using specialized software, such as Quite Imposing (https://www.quite.com/).

David Creamer
Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Certified Professional, and Adobe Certified Expert (since 1995)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Let's separate those two.


1. Yes, most printers want PDFs
2. No reputable printer would expect you to do the imposition and if you did, you'd like get charged extra to fix it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Bob--I'd rephrase that a little...😁

No reputable printer would expect you to do the imposition and if THEY did--FIND ANOTHER PRINTER!

David Creamer
Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Certified Professional, and Adobe Certified Expert (since 1995)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well, if they did, they wouldn't be reputable so I'm sticking with my version. 🙂

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Just because the role of "devil's advocate" seems to come naturally to me, I'll offer an example of designer-imposed spreads required:

 

Not long ago, I had a job where the deliverable was a batch of bilingual instruction booklets (English/French, English/Spanish, etc.). The design put the two languages back-to-back, inverse to each other in a shared saddle-stitched booklet. In other words, if you were looking at the English cover, flip the (whole) booklet over (vertical tumble, keeping the binding left), and now you're looking at the French cover on the other side. The final page of each language lived side-by-side on the center spread with the other language (upside-down). It was a pretty nifty way to do it, but if you find the above explanation a bit hard to sort in your mind, you'd be much like the printer, who couldn't seem to get it straight until I sent along a pre-imposed copy as reference. In the end, they asked me to send printer's spreads for all the booklets, mostly I assume, to indemnify themselves from getting the imposition wrong.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well said. Thank You. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

There's always exceptions to any "rule" but [imho] a printer shouldn't have a hard time with two PDFs--one for verso pages and one for recto pages. 

David Creamer
Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Certified Professional, and Adobe Certified Expert (since 1995)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi John, but did you create the imposition using Print Booklet? I don't think it is capable of work and tumble. What you are describing doesn't sound that complicated, the book printers I've used would supply an imposed dummy for corrections before going to press.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Rob, I could have set the files up so Print Booklet would work, but I didn't for several other reasons inherent in the way the files were configured from the outset. I imposed the spreads manually using linked copies.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 28, 2021 Dec 28, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

For prepress, yes you need to have the pages divisible by 4. I use the package feature because it will show you any possible problems. Set the pdf to your printers specs and save. Then package and everything is in a neat folder. Most printers require a pdf. That maybe the all you need to send them, check with your printer.

Lee- Graphic Designer, Print Specialist, Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It would seem that as a professional product where most professional users are creating files "for printers", that this would not only be a feature, but a prominant advantage of its products to the design community.

 

Hi @1Ton Imposition is like trapping, and to a certain extent, color management—they all depend on the press conditions and the designer typically doesn’t know the details, so they are better handled in the RIP. Should the imposed signatures be 2-, 4-, or 8-up? How much creep is needed? Is it Perfect or Saddle Stitch? How may pages in each signature?

 

I’m not running CC2022, but the Acrobat PPD works in CC2021 have you tried installing the PPD in the 2022 Presets folder?

 

https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/kb/add-acrobat-ppd.html

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yes. I downloaded the PPD file from Peter's link and was able to complete the process. Thank You

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2021 Dec 21, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi 1Ton,

the PPD still works with InDesign 2022 on my Windows 10 machine.

No issue to print to PostScript using the PPD and distill a PDF with Acrobat Distiller.

 

Are you on MacOS ? Which one?

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines