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Seeking inDesign/Photoshop Help - Total Ink Coverage

New Here ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Hello,

 

I am seeking help as I try to get the total ink coverage of a document below 240%. 

 

I have viewed the document using color separation in inDesign to determine where there it is over ink by 241%.

 

I have opened the art assets in Photoshop, and used Convert to Profile to create a custom CYMK profile that is set to 235% total ink. Then set mode to RGB and back to CYMK to apply the profile. All my art is either .psd, .tiff, or .jpg (I believe they all can embed color profiles).

 

Upon updating that art in inDesign, the art still appears over ink. I have inDesign set to preserve embedded color profiles.

 

I can't see to get the total ink changes in Photoshop to be reflected in inDesign. Any tips?

 

Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional , Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021
I have opened the art assets in Photoshop, and used Convert to Profile to create a custom CYMK profile that is set to 235% total ink Hi @PuraSoza, how exactly did you do that? Convert to Profile desn’t let you make custom profiles. Can you show a screen capture of the Convert to Profile settings you used to make the conversion? Photshop’s Color Settings>Working Spaces>CMYK>Custom lets you create and save .icc profiles using the legacy CMYK setup dialog. That could solve your total ink proble...

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Advocate ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Hello,

 

In your situation where you know that the steps for correcting TAC using GCR were followed exactly and it appears that the file was not corrected in Indesign. Below are some troubleshooting steps that will help you correct the file.

 

1. In the InDesign file, make sure the new “Fixed” image is linked.

2. Select the image in InDesign.

3. Right-click on the image, and select “Graphics” in the pop-up menu.

4. Then select “Image Color Settings”

In the “Image Color Settings” window, make sure that the Profile is set to “Use Document Default” or “U.S. Web Coated (SWOP)v2” or what ever your default document settings needs to be. If it is not, change it to be one of these profiles.

Screen Shot 2021-06-21 at 10.56.30 AM.png

 

Regards,

Mike

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New Here ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Thank you for the response. I checked my artwork and all assets are set to "Use Document Default". In my Color Settings, my CYMK Working Space is using "U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2). My Color Management Policies for CYMK is set to Preserve Embeded Profiles.

 

I also checked the over ink in Acrobat after exporting using the Output Preview and it also shows over ink when set to 241%.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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I have opened the art assets in Photoshop, and used Convert to Profile to create a custom CYMK profile that is set to 235% total ink

 

Hi @PuraSoza, how exactly did you do that? Convert to Profile desn’t let you make custom profiles. Can you show a screen capture of the Convert to Profile settings you used to make the conversion?

 

Photshop’s Color Settings>Working Spaces>CMYK>Custom lets you create and save .icc profiles using the legacy CMYK setup dialog. That could solve your total ink problem, but it wouldn’t likely be an accurate color profile of the press—there is more to a profile than total ink limits.

 

Screen Shot 3.png

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New Here ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Hey Rob, thanks for the reply.

 

I used Convert To Profile, then under Destination Space, Profile: I used the drop down and selected "Custom CMYK" which brought me to the same screen you have here. I ented the 235% and clicked OK all the way through. But as you said, I don't think I was saving and applying as I thought.

 

Thank you for the insight.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Actually I didn’t realize you could get at the Color Settings’ Custom CMYK dialog via the Convert dialog.

 

However doing it that way doesn’t save the profile and make it available in other applications or InDesign, so you could save it as an .icc profile via Color Settings>CMYK>Save CMYK... into your Profiles folder where you can set it as InDesign’s document profile via Edit>Assign Profiles and not have conflicting output profiles.

 

Screen Shot 23.png

 

Did you double-check the total ink in the converted Photoshop file to confirm that it is 235% there?

 

Are you using any blending modes in InDesign? Blending modes like Multiply or Darken interacting with an image can increase the total ink even when the image itself does not exceed the limit.

 

Also, you want the image values to output unchanged, so it doesn’t need an embedded profile. Profiles need to be embedded if there are going to be additional color conversions downstream, and you don’t want that to happen.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 21, 2021 Jun 21, 2021

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Is your InDesign document’s assigned profile Edit>Assign Profiles... also your custom profile? If you embed the profile with the image and it conflicts with the document’s CMYK profile, the output numbers you see in Separation Preview would be the conversion from the embedded profile to the document profile. If the document’s assigned profile is the default US Web Coated SWOP it allows 300%

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