Show Pantone Colours in Separations

Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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Dear community, 

 

how to have pantone colours show in the separations panel? 

 

Thanks!

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Adobe Community Professional , Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021
If they are spot colours they are listed in the seperations panel. But if they are (converted to) PMS process colours of course you  wil just see CMYK.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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If they are spot colours they are listed in the seperations panel. But if they are (converted to) PMS process colours of course you  wil just see CMYK.

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Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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Yes, makes sense, thanks. (My printer demands pantone colours for silk screen, but since there doesn’t seem to exist a full black in pantone+ solid uncoated, I went for pantone+ cmyk uncoated, which, as you expain correctly, doesn’t show since in fact it is simply K. Well. I was hoping that in separations, it would still be displayed as PANTONE P Process Black U, and accordingly in the separations my printer would see when looking into the file, but well. Hope it’ll work anyhow.)

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Contributor ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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Not sure what you mean by a "full black" in Pantone+ solid uncoated. My library has Pantone Black U. It's definitely not a "rich black", but that's just a rendering thing. All that matters to a printer is that the file separates into its proper colors, not what the onscreen preview looks like.

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Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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Hello Dave,

 

yes, you are right, “full black” is an expression very much wanting in precision. I initially looked into the Pantone+ Solid Uncoated library, yet according to the Swatch Options panel when set to Lab, Pantone P Process Black U is L17, a4, b8, whereas the blackest blacks from the Pantone+ solid uncoated library seem to be  Neutral Black U with L31 (!), a 1, b2, actually a darkish grey, and  Pantone Black 6 U with an even lighter L33, a1, b-5. 

 

I was surprised that the entire Pantone uncoated library shouldn’t contain any actual black, but so it seems. And since in fact I would love to employ an even darker black, maybe some high pigment black, I went for the nearest thing I could find, being Pantone P Process Black U, being actually K with a different name. It may very well be though that I get something wrong here. Did I?

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Contributor ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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If you're needing a "rich black" for viewing (keeping in mind that the printer just wants a spot separation & they will print with whatever black they're using), you can create your own color "Rich Spot Black". I typically use C60 / M40 / Y40 / K100 and define it as a spot color in Indesign. This will give you the preview you want and print as a separation for the vendor.

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Explorer ,
Dec 15, 2021 Dec 15, 2021

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Yes, good idea. I failed to mention that the silk screen printer I’m looking to work with demands a Pantone colour, but your second hint—that in fact he will print whatever he likes to pour into his machine—is helpful, too. 

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