TYPE 1 Fonts

New Here ,
Feb 24, 2022 Feb 24, 2022

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Very concerned about Type 1 font being disabled. I work on hundreds of files that contain these fonts. Adobe should provide a seamless font swop out of likeness fonts once prompted fonts are missing. Otherwise fonts within documents will reflow causing a catastrophe. Please advise.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2022 Feb 24, 2022

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Which software are you using? 

 

If you want to keep using legacy fonts, do so at your own risk and revert to previous software versions. 

I don't think it's possible for Adobe to swap fonts for you. That's a design choice only you can make.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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New Here ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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Hello Nancy and thank you for your response. Currently running macOS Monterey 12.2 with Font Book v10.0. If I understand correctly, the Type 1 fonts that have been embebeded into legacy InDesign files can reamian as long as I use a different Font application? What does Adobe recommend? This is obviously not a one off issue but impacts every agency who's been building layouts with these fonts. Pleasew advise.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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Moderator moved from Using the Community (forums) to In Design.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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You have been given years to address this. Opentype has been around for more 20 years.

Adobe is not going to replace your fonts though some may be available through the Adobe Fonts service.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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In January 200022 years ago — the entire computer industry formally migrated to OpenType / Unicode fonts. Operating systems, software, and digital media all converted. Adobe's PostScript/Type 1 fonts were no longer available after that date.

 

The benefits you've missed for the past 22 years:

 

  • Extended character set. Type 1 fonts are limited to around 216 glyphs on a font. Although that covers most traditional ASCII characters, the fonts don't have a full set of punctuation marks, special symbols, foreign accented characters, math/STEM symbols. Most OpenType fonts have between 1,000 – 3,000 glyphs on one font.
     
  • Cross platform use. Not just between Macs and Windows systems, but also with HTML websites, EPUBs, and all forms of digital media ... and traditional print, too.  PostScript Type 1 fonts work only for printed documents.
     
  • Worldwide accessibility. One third of the world's population has an impairment or disability that hinders their use of computer technology ... and access to billions of documents, from textbooks to marketing brochures. International accessibility standards require Unicode / OpenType fonts to guarantee full accessibility to everyone.
     
  • New font technologies. Variable fonts are just one of the newest technologies that help us designers with our projects. That tech isn't available for PostScript Type 1 fonts. (So cool, I get to determine the exact font weight I need for a project. Love it!)

 

quoteAdobe should provide a seamless font swop out of likeness fonts once prompted fonts are missing.
By @dalev39076785

 

Most of Adobe's font library from pre-2000 was converted to OpenType fonts and is available through Adobe Fonts, right within InDesign or at https://fonts.adobe.com/All free with your Creative Cloud subscription.

 

In addition to that method, InDesign automatically scans your document and your system's fonts whenever you open a document. Any missing Type 1 fonts are flagged, valid Adobe OpenType fonts are suggested, and a click of your mouse will automatically swap out the old for the new.

 

Seriously, what's your complaint?

You didn't get enough memos about this industry-wide change?

Over the past 22 years?

 

Bevi Chagnon | PubCom | Designer & Technologist for Accessible Documents | Books & Classes | InDesign | PDFs | Office |

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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>>the entire computer industry formally migrated to OpenType / Unicode fonts

Except--maybe--for Apple. They like their TrueType and used dFonts for quite a while...

David Creamer
Adobe Certified Instructor, Adobe Certified Professional, and Adobe Certified Expert (since 1995)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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@Bevi Chagnon - PubCom wrote:

In addition to that method, InDesign automatically scans your document and your system's fonts whenever you open a document. Any missing Type 1 fonts are flagged, valid Adobe OpenType fonts are suggested, and a click of your mouse will automatically swap out the old for the new.


 

Yes... @dalev39076785, that is the “seamless font swap” requested in your original post. It has already been built into InDesign for many years, and combined with the fonts included through Adobe Fonts that you can swap to, all of the tools are already in place for you to swap out your fonts as you asked.

 

It won’t be without some manual intervention, especially if unusual fonts were used that don’t have substitutes for Adobe Fonts, or if the replacement fonts have slightly different metrics. But this situation was anticipated long ago and the tools put in place to handle it.

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New Here ,
Feb 28, 2022 Feb 28, 2022

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Thank you Bevi for your reply. Helpful!

As a point of reference, a large percentage of InDesign files I recieve from agencies are still littered with Type 1 fonts. I recieve the nofitfication below.

Screen Shot 2022-01-18 at 6.12.41 PM.png

Hoping this conversation is moot and will not require a relow of all text each time I open a legancy InDesign files next year. Cheers!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 28, 2022 Feb 28, 2022

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quote
...a large percentage of InDesign files I receive from agencies are still littered with Type 1 fonts. I receive the notification below.

Screen Shot 2022-01-18 at 6.12.41 PM.png

By @dalev39076785

 

We've taken a pro-active approach with our clients.

We've been educating them through our customer newsletters about OpenType fonts since 2000, and today, we rarely see a Type 1  / PostScript font from them.

 

Our classes and blogs also teach the benefits of OpenType fonts, like the 64,000 cool glyphs of the Unicode character set that can be built into OpenType fonts — https://www.unicode.org/charts/  Foreign language alphabets. The Euro symbol . The Interrobang . Math/Science symbols. Dingbats galore! Emoticons!!!  The Vulcan salute, Live Long and Prosper emoji  (Unicode symbol 1F596 that most likely can't be displayed on this website). (Every font should have that glyph!)

 

InDesign's blue Type 1 warning bar in your note could be used as a great segue in a customer newsletter, "Wondering what's up with InDesign's blue warning bar? ..." and then give them a short run-down on fonts, why OpenType, how to swap fonts in InDesign, and after 12/31/20xx your company will not accept files with Type 1 fonts. They are kaput.

 

It's the graphic designer's responsibility to choose and use fonts correctly, not yours or mine.

 

At our shop, we reject all client files that are not built to today's standards for press or accessibility: If there's a Type 1 / PostScript font in the file, it's returned to them to correct and swap out with an OpenType font. If there's text reflow, that's the client's job to solve, not ours.

 

Otherwise, they can pay us to swap the fonts, but with these notes on their signed Work Order form:

  • We will attempt to choose a font that matches their original as best we can. But all bets are off.
  • There will be text reflow. Might be minor, might be humongous. RE: line endings, hyphenation, justification, tracking, kerning, and copy length, all bets are off.
  • We may need to make visual design and layout adjustments to maintain the copy length, such as to keep the content within a 4-page newsletter. All bets are off.
  • There are no estimates for time / labor charges to do this. Could be $1,000. Could be $10,000, especially if we have to purchase new fonts with licensing for embedding rights. The meter starts running when we open the file and we pre-approve their credit card for $xxxx dollars before we start.

 

So far, only 2 clients have hired us to swap their fonts and return a revised template to them. Everyone else made the changes themselves. Which is how it should be done.

 

22 years. 22 years.

You have to wonder how clients missed so many memos over the past 2 decades.

 

Bevi Chagnon | PubCom | Designer & Technologist for Accessible Documents | Books & Classes | InDesign | PDFs | Office |

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New Here ,
Feb 28, 2022 Feb 28, 2022

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Well documented! Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2022 Feb 25, 2022

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You have some QC work ahead of you. Even if you swap a same OT font for the old T1 of the same name, it will most likely trigger a reflow of text. 

Mike Witherell

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New Here ,
Feb 28, 2022 Feb 28, 2022

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TY Mike. My concern exactly!

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