Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


What is a client looking for when they ask for a Layout?

Explorer ,
Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm working with a client on creating a brochure for their company, and they asked for a layout before getting into the stylistic stuff.

What does this typically mean I should be including? Imagery, text, text arrangement, and maybe some blocked out sections where more refined design elements will go? Any help would be appreciated.

TOPICS
How to

Views

235

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021
I think that you answered your own question. That is exactly what a client needs to see—"Imagery, text, text arrangement, and maybe some blocked out sections where more refined design elements will go". Usually a presentation to a client would include a general idea of what the cover and one or two sample spreads might look like. Generally, "dummy" images pulled from perhaps a Google image search or low-res images from a site like Getty Images will suffice as long as the stand-in images you pick...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021
I think what has been previously stated is useful though a better word might be “a treatment”. I suggest though before coming up with some ideas, you have a further conversation with the customer to get more information from them, such as what kind of size does the customer have in mind, do they want full colour or simple black and white or a mix, have they a house style and branding, will third party suppliers (eg photographers or illustrators) need to be commissioned, who is handling the print...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Mar 27, 2021 Mar 27, 2021
Perhaps you should get your client to more precisely define what's meant by "layout." It's not likely you're going to give your client what's expected if you're blindly diving into the job. My general interpretation is often called a dummy layout, which as has been already described here: sample images, greeked text, client logos and color schemes. Generally, a loose composition to simulate what the final job will be. Essentially, designing the brochure without any live content so you and the ...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think these are good items to have:

  1. a column layout would make it look more professional. what size is the brochure?
  2. use master pages, set up page numbers, disclaimer, logo placeholder
  3. paragraph styles (h1, h2, h3, h4, bodycopy, bullet list level 1,2,3, numbered lists), character styles (bold, italic, superscript, subscript 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Mar 27, 2021 Mar 27, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Thanks for the feedback, the size of the bifold brochure is tabloid size, folded in half, so 4 pages of 8.5x11.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think that you answered your own question. That is exactly what a client needs to see—"Imagery, text, text arrangement, and maybe some blocked out sections where more refined design elements will go". Usually a presentation to a client would include a general idea of what the cover and one or two sample spreads might look like. Generally, "dummy" images pulled from perhaps a Google image search or low-res images from a site like Getty Images will suffice as long as the stand-in images you pick are similar to what you will eventually either have shot or buy the rights to (under no circumstances can you use images that you don't have ownership of for final production). "Greeked" text (Type Menu>Fill With Placeholder Text) will also do for body copy but since you're selling concept it would be best to make the headlines as close to actual copy as possible.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I think what has been previously stated is useful though a better word might be “a treatment”.

I suggest though before coming up with some ideas, you have a further conversation with the customer to get more information from them, such as what kind of size does the customer have in mind, do they want full colour or simple black and white or a mix, have they a house style and branding, will third party suppliers (eg photographers or illustrators) need to be commissioned, who is handling the printing, do they have a budget and is timing critical (this can be vital for items for exhibitions and campaigns) how is the text being supplied, what kind of proofing is wanted?

Establishing these kinds of parameters can sometimes save a lot of wasted time and misunderstanding.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 26, 2021 Mar 26, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Need to find the basics - what is the printed/online size?

How many layouts? Magazines can have different templates for different sections?

 

Typically - just blank boxes with some lorem ipsum text for a look and feel.

If they already supplied content, then use that.

 

I typically give them 2 spreads from a supplied file.

Perhaps one with a lot of text and a few images.

Maybe another that is more image heavy.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2021 Mar 27, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I suggest you have an aggreement in hand about payment before giving them anything. On the printing side, a layout can also define how the job will run on a press (AKA an imposition), but that's probably not what your client wants. If the brochure is multi-page, indicate the short pages and how it will fold, a sketch or pic of a folding dummy for a multi-page brochure is a nice touch.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2021 Mar 27, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Perhaps you should get your client to more precisely define what's meant by "layout." It's not likely you're going to give your client what's expected if you're blindly diving into the job.

 

My general interpretation is often called a dummy layout, which as has been already described here: sample images, greeked text, client logos and color schemes. Generally, a loose composition to simulate what the final job will be. Essentially, designing the brochure without any live content so you and the client can discuss what you like and don't like about the design and hash out how to deliver what your client needs.

 

Be sure to use the client's actual logos. It's important for clients to feel the work you present is done just for them. Actually using their logos and other graphic elements to reinforce the client's design language strongly reinforces you recognize that.

 

It's also probably a bit of a tryout. Your client likely wants to see what you can do, if given the opportunity. In short, if your client doesn't like the comp, it provides a spot where the job can be stopped before more time, effort and expense is racked up to create an end product.

 

Please allow me step up on my soapbox. If right now you don't know what your client is looking for in preliminary work for the job, you need to get with said client and work out exactly what your client expects from you. If you don't know, and the client isn't telling you, there's room for great misunderstanding. At it's best, that'll turn out to be extra work/re-work to get everyone and everything on the same page(s). At its worst, it turns into pay disputes and damaged reputations. More design jobs go wrong through bad communication than any other cause. Any graphics pro here can share many/great tales of woe that started from misunderstandings of what was expected for a job.

 

Delivering what your client expects and wants is the key to a successful business relationship. Understanding what's expected at the start of the job will save you immeasurable time and expense down the road. The worst part is you won't be able to recognize how much it cost until after the job is finally done.

 

*steps off soapbox*

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 27, 2021 Mar 27, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines