Accessibility within InDesign

New Here ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Hello All! I am working in InDesign v 16.0 and learning how to build accessible pdfs. I have found that using the articles pannel is the easiest for me. I am wondering if you start a new article for each page or if it is 1 article for the whole document? Any other accessibility tips would be greatly appreciated, I am new to this!

Whew. Lot of topics in that short post!

First, the <Art>/Article tag is a container/grouping tag that wraps around a bunch of content tags (like <P>, <H2>, <L>, <Table>) to create a logical area of the larger document.

<Art> tags are created for each story/article dragged into the Articles Panel. How you group your stories is up to you. Some examples:

  • If it's a small document, like a fact sheet or brochure, then 1 <Art> in the PDF might be sufficient for the whole document.
  • If it's a 10-chapter book, then each chapter could be a separate <Art>, and there would be 10 (or more) <Art> tags in the entire PDF.
  • A magazine would have 1 <Art> tag for each feature story.

 

Quote: "Any other accessibility tips would be greatly appreciated"

 

Ha ha! That's like asking how to use Photoshop in a little post in this forum. Accessibility is an extremely broad, but specific, requirement and you really need formal training in how to do it with InDesign. Look for classes from:

 

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Accessibility within InDesign

New Here ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Hello All! I am working in InDesign v 16.0 and learning how to build accessible pdfs. I have found that using the articles pannel is the easiest for me. I am wondering if you start a new article for each page or if it is 1 article for the whole document? Any other accessibility tips would be greatly appreciated, I am new to this!

Whew. Lot of topics in that short post!

First, the <Art>/Article tag is a container/grouping tag that wraps around a bunch of content tags (like <P>, <H2>, <L>, <Table>) to create a logical area of the larger document.

<Art> tags are created for each story/article dragged into the Articles Panel. How you group your stories is up to you. Some examples:

  • If it's a small document, like a fact sheet or brochure, then 1 <Art> in the PDF might be sufficient for the whole document.
  • If it's a 10-chapter book, then each chapter could be a separate <Art>, and there would be 10 (or more) <Art> tags in the entire PDF.
  • A magazine would have 1 <Art> tag for each feature story.

 

Quote: "Any other accessibility tips would be greatly appreciated"

 

Ha ha! That's like asking how to use Photoshop in a little post in this forum. Accessibility is an extremely broad, but specific, requirement and you really need formal training in how to do it with InDesign. Look for classes from:

 

TOPICS
How to

Views

29

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Translate

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Dec 09, 2020 0
Participant ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Whew. Lot of topics in that short post!

First, the <Art>/Article tag is a container/grouping tag that wraps around a bunch of content tags (like <P>, <H2>, <L>, <Table>) to create a logical area of the larger document.

<Art> tags are created for each story/article dragged into the Articles Panel. How you group your stories is up to you. Some examples:

  • If it's a small document, like a fact sheet or brochure, then 1 <Art> in the PDF might be sufficient for the whole document.
  • If it's a 10-chapter book, then each chapter could be a separate <Art>, and there would be 10 (or more) <Art> tags in the entire PDF.
  • A magazine would have 1 <Art> tag for each feature story.

 

Quote: "Any other accessibility tips would be greatly appreciated"

 

Ha ha! That's like asking how to use Photoshop in a little post in this forum. Accessibility is an extremely broad, but specific, requirement and you really need formal training in how to do it with InDesign. Look for classes from:

 

Design + Accessibility | Author | Designer | Programmer | Trainer

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New Here ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Thank you for the guidence!

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