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Color Fill on Button Fields Disapear After Export to PDF (Interactive)

New Here ,
Sep 15, 2020

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I'm working on an interactive survey form in Adobe InDesign. In the text fields I have a semi-transparent color fill. 
After exporting into a PDF the color disapears. This does not happen if the text field does not have a button entity applied to the object. 

 

The PDF form on the right you can see the one text field that still has color after export. This is the one text field that does not have a Button and Form applied to it. 

 

Anyone know how I can retain those colors after export in the button fields? 

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Color Fill on Button Fields Disapear After Export to PDF (Interactive)

New Here ,
Sep 15, 2020

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I'm working on an interactive survey form in Adobe InDesign. In the text fields I have a semi-transparent color fill. 
After exporting into a PDF the color disapears. This does not happen if the text field does not have a button entity applied to the object. 

 

The PDF form on the right you can see the one text field that still has color after export. This is the one text field that does not have a Button and Form applied to it. 

 

Anyone know how I can retain those colors after export in the button fields? 

scrnsht2.jpg

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How to, Import and export

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103

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Sep 15, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 15, 2020

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Acrobat, by default, will show you interactive fields highlighted in blue.

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Sep 15, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 15, 2020

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You say by default, does that mean there is a way in Acrobat to change that?

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Sep 15, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 15, 2020

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Won't matter as you can't force that change on the recipients.

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Sep 15, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2020

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The short answer is Yes, but you likely don't want to.

 

The blue is an indicator that the filed can be interacted with. It doesn't print; it's simply the generally-accepted indication that the form field is there to be filled out. You can test it if you want, and see that the moment you enter something into the field, the Blue Screen of Data Request disappears.

 

But if you're determined to change the color of an unfilled form field, you can. Read the link below to find out more about it:

 

Changing the color of form fields

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

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Sep 15, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 15, 2020

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So it did help me figure out how to change the color of the field, but as Bob mentions if it's recipient based then it won't matter. 
We have far too many clients to add in a script that automatically changes the color and thus any other files.

 

I don't think this default is a necessary feature as it is only a visual marker for fillable fields, but I don't see Adobe changing it. 
I suppose the question at this point would be if I changed the highlight color from blue to something else, would clients receiving the form still have their highlight as blue or would that at least be modified to what I changed it to?

 

 

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Sep 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2020

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See, when I read the responses to that thread, I thought the real questions were: What is getting rid of the blue fillable form fields really worth to you? And frankly, Is this trip really necessary?

 

Based on your response, it looks like your conclusion to the second question is: No, it is not. Though I personally believe that your reasoning regarding visual markers for fillable fields is somewhat suspect. As it is now, if there's no blue box it means that the field can't be filled out on the digital form, or the receiver has already recognized the field could be filled out directly on the PDF form and has already done it. I see that as useful User Interface design, and a good thing.

 

The first one, however, remains an open question: What's it really worth it to you to destroy the function of a PDF form you can fill out directly In Adobe Acrobat/Adobe Reader to get rid of the blue boxes? Only you can answer that. But if it means that much to you, you can open the PDF in Acrobat DC, get your Prepare Form tools, then select and delete every single offending blue box. You'll still have a PDF file you can print out and fill out by hand, but you'll have none of the functionality of a fillable PDF form.

 

It's your call.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

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Sep 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 15, 2020

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One more thing to make your life easier: rather than design your form fields within InDesign, you'll get much better results building the interactivity directly in Adobe Acrobat.

 

You'll get more options/capabilities, better design and a lot more functionality both for the recipients filling out the forms and for you and/or your organization to digitally compile them by using Acrobat's PDF form capabilities instead of InDesign's more rudimentary tools. You can find out a lot more about creating, distributing and compiling data from interactive Acrobat PDF forms through the link below:

 

Creating fillable PDF forms from Acrobat DC

 

Once you get past the sales pitch at the top of the webpage, there's lots of good information on creating fillable PDF forms, and links to learn all the nitty-gritty on building and compiling data from interactive PDF forms. If you run down the rabbit hole from this link for a while and get smart on Acrobat form capabilities, you'll be amazed what you can do with PDF forms. And it'll likely make you the organization's valuable expert on PDF forms.

 

Randy

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 15, 2020

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At this point, you'd be far better of in the Acrobat forum than here. This goes beyond anything to do with InDesign, but also keep in mind that beyond Acrobat or Reader this whole thing is a bit of a crapshoot anyway.

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Sep 15, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 24, 2020

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Randy, your response is suspect. I appreciate the passive aggressive assistance, albeit rather presumptious, but it is still welcome. 

 

"What is getting rid of the blue fillable form fields really worth to you? And frankly, Is this trip really necessary?"

Your first question presumes that I am the one dictating the entire design. If my boss asks for something in a particular way, I will pursue the matter to see if I can make it work. It's worth it to me to create an end result that he is satisfied with. 
Your second question presumes that I understand every element of how both Acrobat and InDesign function and are meant to function. Why would I ask a question that was unnecessary? Education isn't about reserving your curiousity.

To answer your suggestion at using Acrobat to create the form, I'll just let you know that the project I am working on began with Acrobat and the mess that it is in designing a form is just too sloppy and inconsistent to be useful. I am working with InDesign because it is incredibly consistent, far more intuitive, easier to complete my goals, and functions like other Adobe products. The only problem thus far, is when I have to integrate it back into Acrobat as an interactive PDF. 

But I'll keep your opinion in mind. Thanks.

 

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Sep 24, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 24, 2020

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I can't control what you infer from my response. Respectfully, I wouldn't even try.

 

As I said, you can change it if you want. Who am I to stop you? It just has consequences. Which you've already acknowledged and have considered unacceptable. Again, that's your call. As is using InDesign to create your PDF form. Which quite honestly severely limits what you can do with a PDF form, but if that's your preference I wouldn't stop you there either. But you asked, and I did my best to provide a good answer to serve your needs.

 

If you're creating an interactive form and you want people to actually fill it out, I'd think it would serve you well to show it is, in fact, an interactive form. I wasn't trying to be snide. Just as I recommended you consider using Acrobat to build your interactive form. Issues with how you find it counter-intuitive aside, Acrobat has far better tools, with far more granular options, for creating the type of document you're seeking to create. If interactive PDF forms are your ultimate goal, it's worth the investment to get up to speed on creating them in Acrobat. Really. InDesign is, at risk of offending the folks here who swear by it, an inferior tool for doing the job. I honestly believe that the superior capabilities of Acrobat for creating, distributing and compiling interactive PDF forms are worth your efforts. Or I wouldn't have suggested it.

 

I'm not offering a non-apology here when I say I'm sorry you took it that way. I'm a volunteer here, who tries to offer the best advice I can to help people past their problems. You don't have to take it, or even agree. I won't make you. I promise.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

 

 

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Sep 24, 2020 0