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Converting for Print

New Here ,
Mar 15, 2020

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Greetings, All...

 

Google search is entirely lacking on this question; as are any forums I've visited and spend a lot of time with. Anyway...

 

I used an rgb file in a program that wasn't InDesign. Placed it on a pdf from B&N Press, and when I received it, it was pixelated. Primarily the back cover text, but also the rest, as well. 

 

I bought InDesign a few days ago and cannot find an answer to this. I hope someone here can help:

 

If I place an image in ID and convert it to cmyk that suits the original colors, should I save the image as .tiff before adding it to pdf? Convert to vector? Or, some other extension before placing it on a pdf template?

 

Obviously the image needs to be as crisp as possible, with zero pixelation - especially with the back cover text; however, tutorial after tutorial, I'm at a loss to an answer. My apologies if this seems daft, but, normally I can find answers to my own questions...but, not this time...

Any help is appreciated...

Sean

 

 

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Converting for Print

New Here ,
Mar 15, 2020

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Greetings, All...

 

Google search is entirely lacking on this question; as are any forums I've visited and spend a lot of time with. Anyway...

 

I used an rgb file in a program that wasn't InDesign. Placed it on a pdf from B&N Press, and when I received it, it was pixelated. Primarily the back cover text, but also the rest, as well. 

 

I bought InDesign a few days ago and cannot find an answer to this. I hope someone here can help:

 

If I place an image in ID and convert it to cmyk that suits the original colors, should I save the image as .tiff before adding it to pdf? Convert to vector? Or, some other extension before placing it on a pdf template?

 

Obviously the image needs to be as crisp as possible, with zero pixelation - especially with the back cover text; however, tutorial after tutorial, I'm at a loss to an answer. My apologies if this seems daft, but, normally I can find answers to my own questions...but, not this time...

Any help is appreciated...

Sean

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2020

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The normal workflow for producing arwork for commercial printing with InDesign is to set up a page or pages to the trimmed pages size, and add bleed to this, usually 3mm. You place your RGB images on these page(s) and they can be PSD, TIFF's or JPGs with an Effective PPI resolution of around 300PPI for book and magazine items. To these page(s) you add your text (in colour or black).

Preferably you get a spec from your printer and produce a PDF for them to print from. The PDF would normally be a PDF/X-4, you specify single pages (not spreads) and tick Crop Marks and Use Document Bleed Settings. Do not convert the document to CMYK.

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New Here ,
Mar 16, 2020

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Hi Derek...thanks for the reply...

 

Thank you for clarifying about the file format. It's Barnes & Noble Press (formerly Nook) that I would print through, and they suggest all artwork to be in cmyk. However, I recently migrated to Adobe products from Gimp, as it's much too limited, and also because there is no cmyk option. 

So if I am understanding you correctly, saving as a .tiff (for example) and following the rest of the guidelines you suggested, should be enough, and not to worry about rgb?

Probably a simple thing for those in the Adobe world, but I'm still learning the basics 😉

Thank you!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2020

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Lets start with your image. 

 

Is it an image or a vector? you mentioned "convert to vector". you can't convert to vector unless you live trace from illustrator, and it not going to look perfect. thats a whole other thing and thats and illustrator conversation.

 

Can we see the image and learn the format of that image?

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New Here ,
Mar 16, 2020

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THE HERMETIC MUSEUM VOLUME TWO.pngHi Jonathan...

 

Above is one of the 41 covers I created using Gimp. Gimp not using vectors, I'm not well-versed in their applications, although I'm learning that they're primarily for simpler images; something I wasn't aware of when I posted yesterday.

The image is a rgb in .png format. I had printed one and the proof was decent, aside from the text being fairly pixelated, which is what prompted me to look into InDesign. I was also assuming images needed to be in cmyk before sending them off, but apparently that's not entirely factual. 

So yeah, that's pretty much it. I have numerous rgb files but, being new to ID, am still learning what can and cannot be accomplished with much of the Adobe software...

Thanks for your help!!



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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 17, 2020

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Going back to your first question about forums and InDesign information, in addition to this forum, there's InDesign Secrets, which is packed with information and ideas about InDesign and ancillory topics, and has a monthly magazine called InDesign Magazine: https://indesignsecrets.com

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