Highlighted

document preset ppi 72 or 300

Explorer ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

I make a document to be printed. Printer-man asks document with 300dpi.

Via Menu / File / Document Presets ... I view following panel:Z-preset.jpg

There I see -72 PPI-

Does that matter? Is that number related to screen-view 72 PPI? What does it mean for my print document for the printer ?

Is it neccecery to change that to 300 DPI? Where do I do that.

 

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

InDesign has a Pixel measurement unit that isn’t related to image resolution. It is equal to 1/72"—1"=72ppi. The Pixel measurement unit is only useful for screen and web projects where you would need to export a page to an image format with a specific pixel dimension, and is not used for print projects.

 

The pages in a document are vector objects and have no resolution. Your printer wants any images placed in your document to have an output resolution of 300ppi. You can get that info by selecting a placed image and checking the Link Panel’s Link Info—the output resolution is listed as Effective Resolution. You can also use InDesign’s Preflight feature to flag images below a defined resolution.

Topics

Print

Views

513

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

document preset ppi 72 or 300

Explorer ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

I make a document to be printed. Printer-man asks document with 300dpi.

Via Menu / File / Document Presets ... I view following panel:Z-preset.jpg

There I see -72 PPI-

Does that matter? Is that number related to screen-view 72 PPI? What does it mean for my print document for the printer ?

Is it neccecery to change that to 300 DPI? Where do I do that.

 

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

InDesign has a Pixel measurement unit that isn’t related to image resolution. It is equal to 1/72"—1"=72ppi. The Pixel measurement unit is only useful for screen and web projects where you would need to export a page to an image format with a specific pixel dimension, and is not used for print projects.

 

The pages in a document are vector objects and have no resolution. Your printer wants any images placed in your document to have an output resolution of 300ppi. You can get that info by selecting a placed image and checking the Link Panel’s Link Info—the output resolution is listed as Effective Resolution. You can also use InDesign’s Preflight feature to flag images below a defined resolution.

Topics

Print

Views

514

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

I never noticed this information which seems absolutely irrelevant. The important thing is that the resolution of the placed images matches with the printer requests

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

InDesign has a Pixel measurement unit that isn’t related to image resolution. It is equal to 1/72"—1"=72ppi. The Pixel measurement unit is only useful for screen and web projects where you would need to export a page to an image format with a specific pixel dimension, and is not used for print projects.

 

The pages in a document are vector objects and have no resolution. Your printer wants any images placed in your document to have an output resolution of 300ppi. You can get that info by selecting a placed image and checking the Link Panel’s Link Info—the output resolution is listed as Effective Resolution. You can also use InDesign’s Preflight feature to flag images below a defined resolution.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

jmlevy + rob_day... thanks.

I thougt so .. is was irrelevant but was not sure about it.

Remains... the only thing is to check te images for 300 dpi.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

As usual, Rob_Day's info is spot on. Just a slight clarification about InDesign's 72 ppi readout.

 

Pixels have no inherent size. Web and video only go by X (width) number of pixels by Y (height) number of pixels--it doesn't matter if the image is at 72, 300, or any other ppi. The ppi setting is only relavent for print. True web graphics programs do not even use the ppi setting. (Anyone remember ImageReady?)

 

The 72 ppi is just the default Adobe applies when a different ppi is not specified in the metadata of the file. (This "tradition" started way back with the first Mac screens being 72 ppi in the mid-80s.) Many other programs picked up this default, so it is commonly used as the "web setting." For example, if you open up an image in Photoshop that just came from a camera and assuming the camera does not pre-assign the ppi (some can), the image will open 72 ppi when it actually doesn't have a ppi (but may when you save it from Photoshop). 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Just a slight clarification about InDesign's 72 ppi readout

 

I think it can be confusing if you are thinking in terms of print output, but the 72ppi listed in the Document Preset under Page information doesn’t refer to the print output resolution of the page, or its images. It’s just indicating that InDesign’s Pixel Ruler Unit always equals a static 1/72"—that value can’t be changed.

 

If I set my default Ruler Units to Pixels with no docs open, the Preset Settings list will look like this:

 

Screen Shot 1.png

 

The PPI: 72 info is only useful if you are Exporting to an image format and want a specific pixel dimension—a JPEG or PNG Export Resolution of 72 ppi will export an image with a pixel dimension matching the listed 504px x 720px Page Width and Height.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 11, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

InDesign converts pixels to inches at 72 ppi because it is primarily a print-based program.

 

The ppi, in this case 72 ppi, is completely unnecessary for web or video in most programs. A 504x720 px image will be 504x720 regardless of if it is at 72, 144, or 288 ppi. Browsers are only interested in pixel size (and reduction percentage if applied)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
rob day LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

it is primarily a print-based program.

 

But it can also be used for screen only projects.

 

If you want to design a banner for a web page, and it needs a predefined pixel dimension, the Pixel ruler unit is a convenient way to setup the document, and export it to a web image format without needing to calculate the export resolution needed to get the desired pixel dimensions. I use InDesign all the time for creating web banners and wireframing because its typesetting tools are much faster than Photoshop’s.

 

If InDesign did not have the static Pixel ruler unit I could work in inches and calculate the needed export resolution by dividing the target pixel dimension by the inch dimension, i.e. a 10" x 8" page would need to be exported at 100ppi in order to get an image pixel dimension of 1000px x 800px, but that’s neither intuitive or convenient. It’s simpler to set up the document as 1000px x 800px and export to 72ppi, which exports a matching pixel dimension.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...