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Force Indesign to ignore Document Fonts Folder?

New Here ,
Jul 07, 2020

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So I know this sounds massively counter-intuitive, but does anyone know if there is a way to force Indesign to ignore the Document Fonts folder in a packaged folder? 

 

In a nutshell, I'm using a (pretty slow) work VPN to access files and folders on a work server and have found that the Document Font folder causes big problems when opening packaged files directly on the server. Even if I install all the fonts on to my local machine, I still get constant spinning wheel and slowdown if I attempt to do anything. 

 

However, if I remove or rename the font folder, the documents open much faster and I have no problems at all. I presume Indesign keeps actively checking the Document Fonts folder, and, due to the slowness of the VPN, this is what is causing my spinning wheel. Can anyone shed any light on this or suggest any other options? 

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Correct answer by Laubender | Adobe Community Professional

Hi AiwaDragon,

you already mentioned the possible solution:

Simply rename the Document fonts folder before you open the InDesign document.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Force Indesign to ignore Document Fonts Folder?

New Here ,
Jul 07, 2020

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So I know this sounds massively counter-intuitive, but does anyone know if there is a way to force Indesign to ignore the Document Fonts folder in a packaged folder? 

 

In a nutshell, I'm using a (pretty slow) work VPN to access files and folders on a work server and have found that the Document Font folder causes big problems when opening packaged files directly on the server. Even if I install all the fonts on to my local machine, I still get constant spinning wheel and slowdown if I attempt to do anything. 

 

However, if I remove or rename the font folder, the documents open much faster and I have no problems at all. I presume Indesign keeps actively checking the Document Fonts folder, and, due to the slowness of the VPN, this is what is causing my spinning wheel. Can anyone shed any light on this or suggest any other options? 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Laubender | Adobe Community Professional

Hi AiwaDragon,

you already mentioned the possible solution:

Simply rename the Document fonts folder before you open the InDesign document.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

TOPICS
Performance

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59

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Jul 07, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2020

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Hi AiwaDragon,

you already mentioned the possible solution:

Simply rename the Document fonts folder before you open the InDesign document.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Jul 07, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2020

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Another option is to use a font manager and have the font(s) open and available before you open the InDesign file.

 

InDesign searches in three places for fonts as it opens a file: first "open" fonts with connections to one of several font management utilities, then "resident fonts" available from specific system font folders, and finally, if the font isn't available on the operator's system, any folder/subfolder where the InDesign document is contained.

 

Even if you're on the Windows platform, where font utility/management software isn't normally used, it's designed to be the first stop for acquiring document fonts. So a font management utility that's compatible with your operating system and your version of Adobe Creative Cloud should circumvent the issue you're encountering nicely.

 

One more thing to add, though: when you open an InDesign file on your server, it's going to save the .indt temp/lock file in the same network folder. So while you'll be able to work with locally-installed fonts with a font management utility, you may find that it may not provide the performance advantages you hope to get from it. Just some food for thought ...

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

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Jul 07, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2020

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The main issue with not working with a Document fonts folder when using a shared environment is that your system installed fonts could differ in small details if an installed font in the system comes not with the exact same font version.

 

I was burnt by that a couple of years ago with a Univers font that had a different horizontal position of an en-dash glyph. The cause was a change that the font foundry made during some years. The customer detected that inconsistency and demanded new print runs for some brochures! The agency, not me personally, I detected the cause, had to bite the bullet and did new print runs without sharing the costs.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 07, 2020

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I understand. It's the jobs we eat that provide the longest-lasting lessons. But then the alternative there is to install the client font with the font handling utility. Or in the original poster's case, install a local copy of the font and use the font handling utility to take precedence.

 

I still have my Client Fonts folder, organized by client, and separate font sets in Suitcase to open the client fonts for working with their jobs. It works like well-oiled clockwork. Though I tire of paying the price every time a new version of MacOS obsoletes my existing version of the utility. So much so, that I'm starting to explore alternatives ...

 

But that's another story.

 

Randy

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