Form blocks with filled rectangles (print, not interactive)

Community Beginner ,
Jan 20, 2021 Jan 20, 2021

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Howdy all,

 

I'm trying to find the best, most editable, non-destructive way of creating forms with 'response' lines that extend to the edges ... but with blocks/rectangles rather than dots or dashed lines. See the example. Top example is what we have achieved, bottom line is closer to what we're hoping to achieve.

The bottom version is built with tables, but obviously creates issues when different lines require different column splits ... it gets messy quickly.
Any pointers or input greatly appreciated. Hoping we don't have to do this manually.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-21 at 2.55.54 pm.png

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correct answers 2 Correct Answers

Adobe Community Professional , Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021
You could try to use a forced right tab (not sure of the English term, the one you get with Shift tab) and apply a thick white underline

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Adobe Community Professional , Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021

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You could try to use a forced right tab (not sure of the English term, the one you get with Shift tab) and apply a thick white underline

Capture d’écran 2021-01-21 à 10.37.41.jpg

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021

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I would do it with tables.

 

"The bottom version is built with tables, but obviously creates issues when different lines require different column splits ... it gets messy quickly."

 

Maybe your approach needs some adjustment. Rather than start with a low number of columns and splitting when you need more, start with something like 12 narrower columns and merge where you need fewer. This helps preserve a useful, uniform grid and facilitates a higher level of complexity without getting "messy". Also, it helps to remember you can nest a smaller table within a cell of a larger table.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021

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Community Beginner ,
Jan 21, 2021 Jan 21, 2021

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Thanks @jmlevy and @John Mensinger

Both feasible options. Will have a play. Thanks for the input!

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