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How can I teach InDesign font equivalences?

Community Beginner ,
Mar 05, 2020

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I regularly move between Windows and Mac computers, storing my InDesign files on the cloud. Nearly everything is seamless, BUT there is an annoyance with fonts.

 

Many fonts on the two computers are in practice identical, but have different names on the two computers, or are in different formats (opentype/truetype), or are treated as different faces on Mac and different fonts on Windows (e.g. Fontname has a Bold face on Mac, but Fontname Bold is a whole different font on PC). Of course, I can use the Find Font dialogue box to fix this every time I open it on the "other" system, and the result is indistinguishable. But for a document which contains maybe 20 different fonts, which I open and save on both computers most days, that is a lot of clicking and scrolling in the dialogue box every day!

 

Is there any way I can teach InDesign to always substitute one particular font for another, and not to bother me with the dialogue? For instance, "when you see Cambria OTF, always automatically substitute Cambria TTF" or whatever?

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Correct answer by BobLevine | Most Valuable Participant
If they have different names they ARE NOT the same font.

At the very least you should be using only Opentype fonts and for additional safety package them into the document fonts folder.

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How can I teach InDesign font equivalences?

Community Beginner ,
Mar 05, 2020

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I regularly move between Windows and Mac computers, storing my InDesign files on the cloud. Nearly everything is seamless, BUT there is an annoyance with fonts.

 

Many fonts on the two computers are in practice identical, but have different names on the two computers, or are in different formats (opentype/truetype), or are treated as different faces on Mac and different fonts on Windows (e.g. Fontname has a Bold face on Mac, but Fontname Bold is a whole different font on PC). Of course, I can use the Find Font dialogue box to fix this every time I open it on the "other" system, and the result is indistinguishable. But for a document which contains maybe 20 different fonts, which I open and save on both computers most days, that is a lot of clicking and scrolling in the dialogue box every day!

 

Is there any way I can teach InDesign to always substitute one particular font for another, and not to bother me with the dialogue? For instance, "when you see Cambria OTF, always automatically substitute Cambria TTF" or whatever?

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Correct answer by BobLevine | Most Valuable Participant
If they have different names they ARE NOT the same font.

At the very least you should be using only Opentype fonts and for additional safety package them into the document fonts folder.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Mar 05, 2020

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If they have different names they ARE NOT the same font.

At the very least you should be using only Opentype fonts and for additional safety package them into the document fonts folder.

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Community Beginner ,
Mar 05, 2020

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Thanks for your reply.

 

I appreciate the advice. But for my purposes, two fonts that have different names but are visually indistinguishable are good enough for me. After all, sometimes it's simply the case that the Mac and PC versions of numerically identical fonts are differently categorised by the operating system, for instance, even if the font files are bit-for-bit identical. (I did a little experiment just now to prove this to myself!)

 

Anyway, this is not what I was asking about. Perhaps it would be easier to disregard the background I provided and simply state my question as follows: Is there any way to automate the process of substituting fonts when I open a document, so that I don't have to manually tell InDesign the equvialences using Find Font each time?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 05, 2020

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I refer you to the previous answer. Read it carefully.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Mar 05, 2020

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No, there's not.

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Community Beginner ,
Mar 06, 2020

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Thanks, this is straightforward. I suspected as much, but I thought I'd ask just in case.

The solution of packaging fonts with the document works well and is what I've used in some cases.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 05, 2020

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Hi Toby,

do you see the issue if you package your InDesign document, move the whole package ( also the Document fonts folder with all used fonts ) to your cloud and work from the InDesign document in the package folder?

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Mar 05, 2020

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Uwe, I suggested that in first answer. 

 

The OP is looking for a way to do it wrong with any problems, not do it right.

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Community Beginner ,
Mar 06, 2020

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Actually I was just asking whether what I proposed was possible. I am perfectly happy to be told that the answer is no! 🙂

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 07, 2020

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I think it is possible if you save your project folder in the Creative Cloud Files folder and the document fonts are saved in the Document fonts folder inside of the project folder.

 

In that case you wont have to move or copy the project folder, it will get sync’d to both your Windows and OSX computers, and you shouldn‘t have font version conflict problems.

 

Screen Shot 33.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 06, 2020

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In case it isn’t completely clear, Uwe’s suggestion to work with a package’s Document fonts folder rather than the OS’s font folders will work with two computers using the same CC account, but you’ll want to save the package to your local Creative Cloud Files folder, which by default gets installed at the root level of your computer’s user directory. That will sync the folder on both machines and the document will always be looking to the Document fonts folder rather than the OS font folders.

 

Another alternative for future documents is to use Adobe Type fonts. In that case you would not have to package, it would just be a matter of saving the ID doc to the CC Files folder.

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