How to find duplicate paragraphs?

Explorer ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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For example, identical text in footnotes need to be styled as Ibid.

In this case, they are consecutive.*
How to get them? Thanks

 

BVC. Annual Report. December /1916

BVC. Annual Report. December /1916

BVC. Annual Report. December /1916

 

* Also, it is possible to find them in diffent locations?

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Advisor , Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021
… Or, without taking in account a "last" carriage-return: Find:  ^((.+)\r)\1*\2Replace by:  $2 [surely very tired for writing such a grep code! Time to go to sleep!  =D ] (^/)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Perhaps I'm not understanding, but you can do it with Edit > Find/Change as shown below. I set "Ibid" to italic by using the Change Format category. The ^p metacharacter stands for End of Paragraph and can be chosen from the @ menu.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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To answer your other question, the instances do not have to be consecutive.

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Enthusiast ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Steve

Why italics for Ibid.?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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I'm not an expert. "Ibid" is an abbreviation for the Latin word ibīdem, meaning "in the same place", commonly used in an endnote, footnote, bibliographycitation, or scholarly reference to refer to the source cited in the preceding note or list item.

 

When I was reading books like this "ibid" was italicized because it's based on Latin. However, the Wikipedia entry says "Some academic publishers now prefer that "ibid." not be italicised, as it is a commonly found term." I included it so I could show how you could use Find/Change to change the word to italics.

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Enthusiast ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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No problem Steve I agree it used to be italicized but normal practise is to not italicize it. The Chicago style guide says:

If you consecutively cite the same source two or more times in a note (complete or shortened), you may use the word “Ibid” instead. Ibid is short for the Latin ibidem, which means “in the same place”. If you’re referencing the same source but different page, follow ‘Ibid’ with a comma and the new page number(s).

Examples

          1. Newton N. Minow and Craig L. LaMay, Inside the Presidential Debates: Their Improbable Past and Promising Future (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008), 24-25.

          2. Minow and LaMay, Presidential Debates, 24-25.

          3. Ibid.

          4. Ibid, 28-30.

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Explorer ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Hi. This is not a post about editing...
Chicago, Oxford, Cambridge have guides.

Here is a problem to find duplicates...

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Explorer ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Steve:

The idea is to identify with grep those identical and consecutive entries (not visually, as we have 516 footnotes) to replace those consecutively repeated (no matter is it is ibid. ibidem, op, cit, etc...)

 

Thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Sorry, that wasn't clear in your original posting. I'm not a GREP expert so others may have to step in to help you.

 

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Explorer ,
Mar 11, 2021 Mar 11, 2021

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Yes, sorry.

Word has a script to do this. But I would like to work it in ID.

 

Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021

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^(.+\r)\1

That should do it.

 

But - I am having mixed results, for example on the ME version on the Mac it finds differently.

On the English version on my PC it finds differently.

 

How odd? 

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Explorer ,
Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021

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No, it doesn'work. It stops after the first finding.
Thanks.

 

 

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Advisor ,
Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021

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Adding a carriage-return at the end of the last para (if not):

 

Find:  ^(.+\r)\1+

Replace by:  $1

 

(^/)  The Jedi

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Advisor ,
Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021

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… Or, without taking in account a "last" carriage-return:

 

Find:  ^((.+)\r)\1*\2

Replace by:  $2

 

[surely very tired for writing such a grep code! Time to go to sleep!  =D ]

 

(^/)

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Explorer ,
Mar 12, 2021 Mar 12, 2021

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Again I am writing the defense of your correct answer as it seems is lost.
A little make-up was enough to achieve a perfect solution.

Thanks for your time, interest and real solution. 

 

 

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