How to use DIC spot color

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May 31, 2020

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The DIC spot color is LAB color. Should I change the color value to CMYK if I send this color to the print shop? Or should I just use the color of the LAB? I'm worried a lot about this now. Now I think that spot color is different from CMYK so I think it is right to use LAB color. People around me, including myself, don't know about it yet and haven't studied information about it.

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Correct answer by Randy Hagan | Adobe Community Professional

I would submit if you've specified any color build in your document as "spot color" that it really doesn't matter which process color model you use to define it. Because if you're printing with spot color, some printer somewhere is going to load one color ink into the press and print whatever color that ink is onto your paper or other substrate. It's going to be that color ink applied on press, or it's not. And it's pot luck whether you're going to get a perfect match in your process color model no matter what process color model you use.

 

If you want to get the perfect spot color on press, you need to specify your spot color using a spot color model. Whether it's PANTONE, DIC, ANPAcolor or TRUMATCH, pick the color you want from a spot color model if you want to ensure you're getting the color you want. And if you want to be sure of those results pick it from something printed on paper/substrate like you want to use, rather than expect something you see onscreen with InDesign to look like what you'll get on press.

 

Pick the color from a printed color book if you expect the printer to give you the color you want. If you're picking spot color onscreen you're chasing an apparition.

 

Now that I'm done ranting, please let me climb down from my soap box and answer your question directly. Which process color model you use to define your DIC color build doesn't matter, and I wouldn't bother. Because spot color is spot color.

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How to use DIC spot color

New Here ,
May 31, 2020

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The DIC spot color is LAB color. Should I change the color value to CMYK if I send this color to the print shop? Or should I just use the color of the LAB? I'm worried a lot about this now. Now I think that spot color is different from CMYK so I think it is right to use LAB color. People around me, including myself, don't know about it yet and haven't studied information about it.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Randy Hagan | Adobe Community Professional

I would submit if you've specified any color build in your document as "spot color" that it really doesn't matter which process color model you use to define it. Because if you're printing with spot color, some printer somewhere is going to load one color ink into the press and print whatever color that ink is onto your paper or other substrate. It's going to be that color ink applied on press, or it's not. And it's pot luck whether you're going to get a perfect match in your process color model no matter what process color model you use.

 

If you want to get the perfect spot color on press, you need to specify your spot color using a spot color model. Whether it's PANTONE, DIC, ANPAcolor or TRUMATCH, pick the color you want from a spot color model if you want to ensure you're getting the color you want. And if you want to be sure of those results pick it from something printed on paper/substrate like you want to use, rather than expect something you see onscreen with InDesign to look like what you'll get on press.

 

Pick the color from a printed color book if you expect the printer to give you the color you want. If you're picking spot color onscreen you're chasing an apparition.

 

Now that I'm done ranting, please let me climb down from my soap box and answer your question directly. Which process color model you use to define your DIC color build doesn't matter, and I wouldn't bother. Because spot color is spot color.

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May 31, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 31, 2020

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It's really very simple: will it be printed in spot colour?

yes - are you going to pay for printing with this special ink (a 1-colour, 2-colour or 5-colour print job)?

no - have you just chosen this colour because you like it, and will print it as normal?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 31, 2020

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I would submit if you've specified any color build in your document as "spot color" that it really doesn't matter which process color model you use to define it. Because if you're printing with spot color, some printer somewhere is going to load one color ink into the press and print whatever color that ink is onto your paper or other substrate. It's going to be that color ink applied on press, or it's not. And it's pot luck whether you're going to get a perfect match in your process color model no matter what process color model you use.

 

If you want to get the perfect spot color on press, you need to specify your spot color using a spot color model. Whether it's PANTONE, DIC, ANPAcolor or TRUMATCH, pick the color you want from a spot color model if you want to ensure you're getting the color you want. And if you want to be sure of those results pick it from something printed on paper/substrate like you want to use, rather than expect something you see onscreen with InDesign to look like what you'll get on press.

 

Pick the color from a printed color book if you expect the printer to give you the color you want. If you're picking spot color onscreen you're chasing an apparition.

 

Now that I'm done ranting, please let me climb down from my soap box and answer your question directly. Which process color model you use to define your DIC color build doesn't matter, and I wouldn't bother. Because spot color is spot color.

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May 31, 2020 0
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Hi there, 

 

I hope your issue has been resolved. But if the issue still persists, please let us know so that we can assist you.

 

If any of the above-mentioned solutions have worked for you, kindly mark the answer correct. 

 

Regards,

Sheena

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