Highlighted

I'm fairly new to InDesign. How can I duplicate the kind of background below? (See screenshot).

Community Beginner ,
Nov 03, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I would appreciate any help I can get.

 

Screen Shot 2020-11-03 at 8.33.49 PM.png

TOPICS
Feature request, How to

Views

73

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

I'm fairly new to InDesign. How can I duplicate the kind of background below? (See screenshot).

Community Beginner ,
Nov 03, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I would appreciate any help I can get.

 

Screen Shot 2020-11-03 at 8.33.49 PM.png

TOPICS
Feature request, How to

Views

74

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Nov 03, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 03, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

There are multiple ways to accomplish this. I would suggest the following:
1. Create a swatch of the blue (or whatever color you choose) background color.
2. Create a text frame that extends outside the page margins and set the fill color of the frame to the background swatch.
3. Make sure your text cursor is active in the frame and type the first line of text.
4. Select and copy that line, hit return, paste it on the second line. Delete the first "THANK" so that the lines offset. Adjust the font, size, and leading to your liking.
5. Select both lines, hit another return, and paste. Keep hitting return and pasting until the text covers the page.
6. Select all of the text and set that to a tint of the background color swatch.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 03, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 03, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Three steps, with a few actions between each step:

 

1. Type your first line of type using the Type Tool, saying Thank You Thank You Thank You until you have enough Thank You(s) to put at least one Thank You past each side of the page. Then get your Arrow/Selection Tool, click on it and use the Edit>Copy menu command, then the Edit>Paste command to create a second line. Move it up to line up the end of the second line's You to align with the end of the closest first line's Thank as shown in the first illustration below.

3.jpg

Then copy both lines and use the Edit>Step and Repeat... menu command to copy the rest of the examples, experimenting with the Vertical: edit box and 1 in the Count: edit box to get the clean matching alignment you're looking for. For my example, as shown below, the right alignment was a Vertical: value of .375 in. Horizontal: value should be 0. If you check the preview box, as shown below, you'll be able to eyeball it as you check.

4.jpg

 But one line won't be enough. To match your example you show, you'll have to get the type size right, then the alignment right, then the number of lines right. If you get those first two right, the right Count: to match your example would be 17, to step and repeat for a total of 36 lines from top to bottom.

2. (The easiest step) Draw a rectangle shape with your Rectangle Tool, as shown in the first illustration below. Give it a Fill of a Dark Blue, and a Stroke of None. If you're printing it, be sure to make the background an eighth-inch larger than the page all around to account for bleed for a page trim. If you're designing a digital document, it doesn't need to be larger than the page. With the rectangle selected, use the Object>Arrange>Send to Back menu command to put it behind the type.

1.jpg2.jpg

Once you've done this, it should look like the illustration below:

5.jpg

3. Use your Selection Tool and the Shift key to select every line of type. Do not select the rectangle. Go back to the Color panel, Click on the "T" button to change the color of the type and change it from Black to White, as shown below.

7.jpgDeselect and you're done.

8.jpg

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

 

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 03, 2020 2
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 04, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Glad that you liked our answers to your issue. I hope they're useful to you.

 

Can I ask a favor of you? Could you please mark the answer(s) that worked for you as Correct Answer? This alerts the moderators to archive this thread and use it to help other users who have similar issues. That's how the Related conversations section below this comment is created.

 

And if you have any problems or issues with InDesign — or heck, any adobe software — in the future, feel free to come back here and ask for help. There are a lot of sharp folks around here who can lend a hand.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Randy

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 04, 2020 1
Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for the thorough walkthrough, Randy. 

 

As I said, I need to learn InDesign for work, and I've only been at it for a couple of months. I have mainly created postcard, but I'm going to have to create a magazine layout very soon. Would you recommend any tutorials or maybe books? I got Adobe InDesign Classroom in a Book, but any additional resources would be of tremedous assistance.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 04, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 04, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Actually, you have a great book for learning InDesign. But actually doing design with it is another thing entirely.

 

I'd go through the Classroom in a Book first, to understand how InDesign works inside and out. It'll teach you how to swing that hammer and chisel. Then I'd seek out the following four things to start turning myself into a budding Michelangelo:

 

Modern Newspaper Design, by Edmund Arnold. This is the bible of not just newspaper design, but print visual communications of any type. This tome sets rules and standards for publication design, and offers handy tips like the "Dollar bill rule", which is if you can place a dollar bill anywhere on the page and it doesn't hit a variation from body type, like a pull quote, sidebar, hedline or graphic (all explained in detail in the book), your page is too grey and bland.

 

The Art of Advertising, by George Lois. Once you've mastered the rules and standards of the Arnold book, Lois will show you how to break them all. Lois was a true wildman of the advertising industry, and sold everything from Cutty Sark scotch, to Volkswagens, to Ronald Reagan.The minimalist, type and one killer image model he mastered in the 1960s is the standard for a lot of leading-edge advertising today. Keep a close eye on this book, though. I end up buying a new one every 5 years or so because someone steals it.

 

Your Local Magazine Rack. You'll find lots of good and bad design done every month on the magazine racks. Things you'd love to do for your own work, and things you'd never want to hang your name on if you did it. Spend an hour every month or so leafing through the magazines, and buy the best — and worst — design you can find, tear out the pages at home and file them away. You'll want to try your own spin on the best design, but it's valuable to keep and take a look at the worst designs too, so you don't accidentally duplicate bad ideas that other designers put in print. Be forewarned, though, that while you're only in it for the designs, others may see your purchases differently. The folks at my favorite bookstore side-eyed me for months when I came up to the cashier with copies of Cosmopolitan, Seventeen and Guns & Ammo.

 

Your Mailbox. Really. If you're like most people, you get lots of junk mail every week. All those folks are working hard to create arresting design that makes you want to set it aside instead of dump it in the circular file. Like your magazine tearsheets, you want to file the best and worst examples away for inspiration when you're searching for ideas to use on your next project. Lots of the best graphic designers go to their clip folders regularly to find and refine good work they can improve on for their own jobs.

 

Design takes a good eye, and lots of practice. But it can be taught, and mastered. Because as Picasso said, “Lesser artists borrow; great artists steal.” This associated link, by the way is a great read for anyone who's looking to start in the graphic design biz. Enjoy.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 04, 2020 0