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Image defective only once placed in InDesign?

Explorer ,
Jun 12, 2020

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I received a JPEG image from one of our business partners that needs to be placed into an InDesign brochure. The image is high quality and looks great. Once I place it into the document, about 75% of it is just "missing" and there is only a portion showing. This isn't happening to any other items I place, no matter the file type. Examples are below; the result is first and the correct image is second.

 

I opened the JPEG in Photoshop, saved it as a PNG, EPS, PSD, and TIFF and it happens to every.single.one. of those file types as well. I opened in Illustrator after removing the background, and placed the AI file. Still happens. Again, it's just THIS image and no other images that I've placed. I'm in high quality view. I've adjusted the resolution, removed the white background, changed the size, etc.

 

 

What-It-Does-Look-Like.png

What-It-Should-Look-Like.png

  

 

Most recent, updated version of Adobe CC is being used across the board. I'm operating the most recent version of Windows. Any ideas? Thanks!

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Randy Hagan | Adobe Community Professional

Based on the bad reproduction of the tank/compressor, I'd check a couple more things in that original image in Photoshop:

 

1) I'd check for different layers in the image, including adjustment layers in the graphic. I've run across rare instances where "non-destructive" adjustment layers got translated into destructive layer masks when exporting the graphic. Create a copy of the file and apply the adjustments to the copy of the original graphic without the adjustment layer functions.

2) Sometimes layers themselves add complexity that doesn't translate well when it's placed — misapplied layer masks (which may or may not be turned off), composited images with elements on different layers, over a transparent background. There can also be things lost in translation with layers in the original image that have been "turned off" by un-checking visibility. In this case, create a copy of the file and merge all visible layers. Then delete the invisible ones. Don't worry if that gives you an opaque white background, you can use InDesign's intrinsic clipping path functions (Object>Clipping Path>Options... menu command) to knock the white background out of the composited image.

 

The hint that there's something funky in the original image lies in how the tank/compressor appears "broken up" when you place the file. Hopefully the suggested fixes I offered above will get you past your problem.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

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Image defective only once placed in InDesign?

Explorer ,
Jun 12, 2020

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I received a JPEG image from one of our business partners that needs to be placed into an InDesign brochure. The image is high quality and looks great. Once I place it into the document, about 75% of it is just "missing" and there is only a portion showing. This isn't happening to any other items I place, no matter the file type. Examples are below; the result is first and the correct image is second.

 

I opened the JPEG in Photoshop, saved it as a PNG, EPS, PSD, and TIFF and it happens to every.single.one. of those file types as well. I opened in Illustrator after removing the background, and placed the AI file. Still happens. Again, it's just THIS image and no other images that I've placed. I'm in high quality view. I've adjusted the resolution, removed the white background, changed the size, etc.

 

 

What-It-Does-Look-Like.png

What-It-Should-Look-Like.png

  

 

Most recent, updated version of Adobe CC is being used across the board. I'm operating the most recent version of Windows. Any ideas? Thanks!

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Randy Hagan | Adobe Community Professional

Based on the bad reproduction of the tank/compressor, I'd check a couple more things in that original image in Photoshop:

 

1) I'd check for different layers in the image, including adjustment layers in the graphic. I've run across rare instances where "non-destructive" adjustment layers got translated into destructive layer masks when exporting the graphic. Create a copy of the file and apply the adjustments to the copy of the original graphic without the adjustment layer functions.

2) Sometimes layers themselves add complexity that doesn't translate well when it's placed — misapplied layer masks (which may or may not be turned off), composited images with elements on different layers, over a transparent background. There can also be things lost in translation with layers in the original image that have been "turned off" by un-checking visibility. In this case, create a copy of the file and merge all visible layers. Then delete the invisible ones. Don't worry if that gives you an opaque white background, you can use InDesign's intrinsic clipping path functions (Object>Clipping Path>Options... menu command) to knock the white background out of the composited image.

 

The hint that there's something funky in the original image lies in how the tank/compressor appears "broken up" when you place the file. Hopefully the suggested fixes I offered above will get you past your problem.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Hi dowald,

check in PhotoShop if there is a clipping path active.

Deactivate it, save the image to a new name and place the modified image.

 

Regards,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Explorer ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Oh shoot - I forgot to mention that I did this already just in case. It wasn't the case.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Based on the bad reproduction of the tank/compressor, I'd check a couple more things in that original image in Photoshop:

 

1) I'd check for different layers in the image, including adjustment layers in the graphic. I've run across rare instances where "non-destructive" adjustment layers got translated into destructive layer masks when exporting the graphic. Create a copy of the file and apply the adjustments to the copy of the original graphic without the adjustment layer functions.

2) Sometimes layers themselves add complexity that doesn't translate well when it's placed — misapplied layer masks (which may or may not be turned off), composited images with elements on different layers, over a transparent background. There can also be things lost in translation with layers in the original image that have been "turned off" by un-checking visibility. In this case, create a copy of the file and merge all visible layers. Then delete the invisible ones. Don't worry if that gives you an opaque white background, you can use InDesign's intrinsic clipping path functions (Object>Clipping Path>Options... menu command) to knock the white background out of the composited image.

 

The hint that there's something funky in the original image lies in how the tank/compressor appears "broken up" when you place the file. Hopefully the suggested fixes I offered above will get you past your problem.

 

Good luck,

 

Randy

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Hey, I'm glad I could help. But can I ask a favor of you?

 

Since you've marked this question as answered, it'll be archived for other people who experience similar problems. Could you please come back to this thread and identify what the problem finally was and which suggestion I made got you past the problem?

 

Also, if you ever find yourself in a jam working with InDesign — or heck, any Adobe program — feel free to come back here and sound the alarm. There are a lot of smart folks around here who are always happy to help.

 

Hope the day treats you well,

 

Randy

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

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Hi Randy,

I'm a bit confused. Doswald said:

"I received a JPEG image"

 

JPEGs are not able to have layers or layer-comps of any kind.

So perhaps it was a PSD image with wrong suffix?

 

Best,
Uwe Laubender

( ACP )

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 12, 2020

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That was my thought too, as JPEGs don't have transparency. They can hold clipping paths, of course, but the messed-up knockout of the tank & compressor clued me in that there could be other possibilities.

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