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InDesign Photo Resolution Problem

New Here ,
Apr 28, 2020

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Hey All,

 

I'm new to ID and to designing. I'm experiencing an image resolution problem. I'm placing high res images into indesign, but InDesign is resizing them. Even though my images are all high resolution they all get placed into ID at 72 PPI. I'm using the file > place function like I normally would. It's also not a display quality issue. The issue is that the images are losing resolution when I place them. They're all .jpg files.

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Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

If you are saving JPEGs from Photoshop don’t use Export. The Export>Save for Web function does not include resolution metadata, so InDesign places those files with the resolution and output dimensions scaled to 72ppi.

 

There’s actually no reason or advantage saving in the JPEG format, use Photoshp Format .psd instead.

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InDesign Photo Resolution Problem

New Here ,
Apr 28, 2020

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Hey All,

 

I'm new to ID and to designing. I'm experiencing an image resolution problem. I'm placing high res images into indesign, but InDesign is resizing them. Even though my images are all high resolution they all get placed into ID at 72 PPI. I'm using the file > place function like I normally would. It's also not a display quality issue. The issue is that the images are losing resolution when I place them. They're all .jpg files.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

If you are saving JPEGs from Photoshop don’t use Export. The Export>Save for Web function does not include resolution metadata, so InDesign places those files with the resolution and output dimensions scaled to 72ppi.

 

There’s actually no reason or advantage saving in the JPEG format, use Photoshp Format .psd instead.

TOPICS
How to, Import and export

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Apr 28, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2020

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The "Effective PPI" is the important figure, which should be around 200 to 300PPI – check in the Links panel

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Apr 28, 2020 1
New Here ,
Apr 28, 2020

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Hey thanks, the effective PPI was around 72 as well. It varied slightly, but was in a 15 point range. I fixed the problem with a workaround. I saw somewhere that someone was having a similar problem with .jpg's in illustrator and someone suggested they convert the jpg to a .tif file. So I tried that out and it worked. For some reason ID is compressing my images if they're a jpg, but it doesn't do it with a .tif. For now I'm converting all my images and replacing them so I can get my project done, but I would like to know why ID is lowering my jpg resolutions when I place them. 

 

Thoughts?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2020

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If you are saving JPEGs from Photoshop don’t use Export. The Export>Save for Web function does not include resolution metadata, so InDesign places those files with the resolution and output dimensions scaled to 72ppi.

 

There’s actually no reason or advantage saving in the JPEG format, use Photoshp Format .psd instead.

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Apr 28, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2020

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No that's not the way to go.

Are you optimising your images in Photoshop, if so, what's size and resolution are they?

You would Place your images in InDesign in RGB color mode in PSD or JPG format (you can use TIF but there's little to gain).

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Apr 28, 2020 1