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PDF and print versions of the same document - keeping them in sync

Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2020

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I have a project that will be released in both PDF and print formats. The text content (all the InDesign elements) will be identical in both, however the project involves a series of vector drawings in PDF format that get overalyed with type in InDesign. The graphics that work for print don't work well in PDF and vice-versa.

At the moment I'm keeping two entirely different folders (2021 Project PDF and 2021 Project Print). 

Is there any way to keep this all in one InDesign file somehow? I'm afraid of getting the two documents out of sync when making changes to either the text or a graphical element.

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PDF and print versions of the same document - keeping them in sync

Explorer ,
Sep 17, 2020

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I have a project that will be released in both PDF and print formats. The text content (all the InDesign elements) will be identical in both, however the project involves a series of vector drawings in PDF format that get overalyed with type in InDesign. The graphics that work for print don't work well in PDF and vice-versa.

At the moment I'm keeping two entirely different folders (2021 Project PDF and 2021 Project Print). 

Is there any way to keep this all in one InDesign file somehow? I'm afraid of getting the two documents out of sync when making changes to either the text or a graphical element.

TOPICS
EPUB, How to, Print

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Sep 17, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2020

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Hard tellin' not knowin' ... we'd probably have to see the jobs to be able to understand your issue and suggest how you can work around the problem. Or at least see the different graphics treatments you're encountering and understand which attributes you want for your end result.

 

I'd be happy to help, as I'm sure that others here would as well. But based on your original post, we have no idea what the problem is.

 

Randy

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Sep 17, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Sep 18, 2020

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Why do some file types well in print and not in internet PDF? What is your problem?

 

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Sep 18, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2020

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I'm most confused ... are you asking this of me?

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Sep 18, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 17, 2020

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It's possible using the Relink To Folder command within the menu of the Links panel to relink a whole series of images from one folder to another. It's also possible during this action to link to files with different extensions.

 

In your scenario, for example, you could have a series of JPEG images in one folder and a second folder that contains a series of Illustrator images with the same file names as the first folder (the file extension would be the only difference: .jpeg vs .ai). Running the Relink to Folder command would replace all of the images in one action.

 

Have a look at the Relink to a different folder section on this page...

https://helpx.adobe.com/au/indesign/using/graphics-links.html

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Sep 17, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2020

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"The graphics that work for print don't work well in PDF and vice-versa."

 

That statement doesn't seem like it should apply to graphics that are 100% vector, if they are. But if I really needed different versions of the same graphics as you describe, I'd just build it all in one file with the PDF-deploy versions one layer, and the for-print versions on another, and turn them on and off as needed.

 

 

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Sep 18, 2020 0
Explorer ,
Sep 22, 2020

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John, this is a brilliant idea. I don't know how to implement it, but I love the idea.

 

I have outlined the reasons for the need for different graphics in reply to a different post, but the quick version is the visibility of a precise color of yellow needed for color lines (railway track maps). They show up great on files intended for viewing on a tablet or screen, but are difficult to see on bright white paper; and stroked lines that look great in print show up almost black on screen.

 

So my next question, as related to your suggestion, would be how do I go about implementing it? I use only about 10 graphic files for 57 pages (vertical-master, vertical-print; horizontal-master, horizontal-print, etc, where print is the same as master except yellow lines have a 0.1 pt stroke). I have placed the files in a precise location on each page, and overlayed InDesign text on top of it. It's all on one layer at the moment; text and graphics, etc.

Would it be possible to move all the graphics from the current single layer to their own layer, duplicate that layer, and then re-link the files on that duplicated layer to the print variants? Or am I overthinking this somehow?


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Sep 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2020

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I'm not sure exactly what the problem is since many print jobs request/require PDFs. 

 

With vector graphics, one possible problem could be that the images are scaled down too much affecting the line weight. (For example, if you reduce an image to 25%, a half-point line could become too thin to print.) 

 

Acrobat has a Page Display preference to Enhance Thin Lines so you might not notice the problem on screen. I suspect other readers have similar features too. Take a look at your PDF with the Page Display Rending options turned off.

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Sep 18, 2020 0
Explorer ,
Sep 22, 2020

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This is precisely the issue. I have some map lines that are solid yellow. When printed on bright white paper stock the yellow virtually disappears, so I have to stroke it .1 or .05 black (thus converting it to a shape rather than a stroke). That same stroked line appears black when viewed as a PDF file on a phone, or tablet, and even on a PC screen when not zoomed in to greater than 400%.

So for the moment, the easiest way is to have one version with these graphics stroked and one normal. I would prefer to be able to print the yellow lines without needing to add the stroke (to keep them editable) but so far I can't figure out a way around this problem. And while that isn't a problem in and of itself, the text portions of the book will now need to be done twice (one for the print version, once for the electronic version). It's just too easy for these two files to fall out of sync.

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Sep 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 22, 2020

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Have you used Acrobat Pro's Fix Hairlines function? It's under the Print Production tools.

 

2020-09-22_17-43-41.png

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Sep 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 18, 2020

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I agree with John, using layers is probably the easiest method. Another option is to use conditional text and anchored objects, as nicely explained here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ14PNO8b-o

Also, If you get to the bottom of why the placed PDF does not work well for both uses, and you want to use one PDF for both, you can include bleed & marks in the final PDF and crop them off in Acrobat. The cropping can be easily reversed in Acrobat for printing.

In this tutorial, learn how to work with conditional text in InDesign. Watch more at http://www.lynda.com/InDesign-tutorials/InDesign-Secrets/85324-2.html?ut...

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Sep 18, 2020 0