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PDF or PSD use for place in Indesign for best result?

Explorer ,
May 21, 2020

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Hi, (i'am new fir Indesign)

 

PDF or PSD use for place in Indesign for best result?

I made simple test to place PS image + text into Indesign. End-result must be printed.

I used in PS6:

doc = 300 DPI  + CMYK + contains image + contains text

a) save as PSD doc ... result in Indesign(after set High quality dsp):  pixalated

b) save as PDF doc ... result in Indesign(after set High quality dsp): better than 'a' (used PDF/X-1a)

 

b*... I read: better text-layers let in original state (not flatten or other manipulation)... is that right way?

 

question:

1) What is best way to get best result (quality) to import a doc made in PS into Indesign.

2) Can I use layers (of de PS-doc) in Indesign (set them on/off)

 

comment: above is about one page (= PS-doc PDF or PSD) . End result however must be a calendar-doc of 12 pages.

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Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

It is a good rule of thumb, but I don’t think it has to be never. Here’s an illustration showing the affect of a halftone screen on output.

 

100% Black and 40% Black saved as both PSD and PDF:

Screen Shot 12.png

Zoomed in I can see the difference between the rasterized text and the vector text in InDesign, but the preview doesn’t actually show the final halftone output:

 

Screen Shot 13.png

 

 

If I output the page to a printer using halftone screens, and magnify, I can see there is an obvious difference when the text is at 100%K on white. There is no halftone here and the output is at the printer resolution (DPI):

 

Screen Shot 15.png

But, when there is halftone interference, there is no visual difference because it is the halftone resolution (LPI) that is output:

Screen Shot 16.png

 

 

 

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PDF or PSD use for place in Indesign for best result?

Explorer ,
May 21, 2020

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Hi, (i'am new fir Indesign)

 

PDF or PSD use for place in Indesign for best result?

I made simple test to place PS image + text into Indesign. End-result must be printed.

I used in PS6:

doc = 300 DPI  + CMYK + contains image + contains text

a) save as PSD doc ... result in Indesign(after set High quality dsp):  pixalated

b) save as PDF doc ... result in Indesign(after set High quality dsp): better than 'a' (used PDF/X-1a)

 

b*... I read: better text-layers let in original state (not flatten or other manipulation)... is that right way?

 

question:

1) What is best way to get best result (quality) to import a doc made in PS into Indesign.

2) Can I use layers (of de PS-doc) in Indesign (set them on/off)

 

comment: above is about one page (= PS-doc PDF or PSD) . End result however must be a calendar-doc of 12 pages.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by rob day | Adobe Community Professional

It is a good rule of thumb, but I don’t think it has to be never. Here’s an illustration showing the affect of a halftone screen on output.

 

100% Black and 40% Black saved as both PSD and PDF:

Screen Shot 12.png

Zoomed in I can see the difference between the rasterized text and the vector text in InDesign, but the preview doesn’t actually show the final halftone output:

 

Screen Shot 13.png

 

 

If I output the page to a printer using halftone screens, and magnify, I can see there is an obvious difference when the text is at 100%K on white. There is no halftone here and the output is at the printer resolution (DPI):

 

Screen Shot 15.png

But, when there is halftone interference, there is no visual difference because it is the halftone resolution (LPI) that is output:

Screen Shot 16.png

 

 

 

TOPICS
Import and export, InCopy workflow

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May 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 21, 2020

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place your psd files in to indesign

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May 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 21, 2020

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Place your images in InDesign as native PSD and in RGB color mode. Regarding the resolution it's measured in PPI not DPI (though they are similar, Dots Per Inch is the term for printing dots). Ensure the images in InDesign have an Effective PPI of between 200 to 300PPI. You add the text and some other items like solid panels in InDesign. You output from inDesign for printing as a PDF (check the spec with your printer), but normally PDF/X-4.

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May 21, 2020 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
May 21, 2020

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If there is text in the Photoshop file you should absolutely save as Photoshop PDF and place that. It will retain the vector properties instead of rasterizing.

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May 21, 2020 2
Explorer ,
May 22, 2020

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Thanks... Derek_Cross and BobLevine for answering.

So I understand to place the PSD file into InDesign is the best way, rather than use the PDF file (and than make text in InDesign).

How com that I see (on screen with High Quality Display -on-) that PSD file placed into InDesign gives more worse result (for image and text: text-layers are original) than when I place PDF into InDesign?

 

PDF result:

PDF result on screenPDF result on screen

PSD result:

PSD result on screenPSD result on screen

 

 

 

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May 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 22, 2020

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The text in the PDF version is left as a vector object and has no resolution. Also InDesign uses a proxy for the preview of placed links, so with the PSD you are not seeing the actual output pixels. A better comparison would be to export your InDesign document and view at 100% in AcrobatPro

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May 22, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
May 22, 2020

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sorry I typed in the wrong place.

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May 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 22, 2020

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You only Place text from Photoshop in InDesign if you've created a special text effect. Normally all text would be set in InDesign.

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May 22, 2020 0