Adobe RGB, sRGB & P3 - need some help to sort out the confusion

New Here ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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Hi guys, today I received my BenQ SW321C, I've calibrated the monitor with Display P3, created an ICC profile file and set the ICC profile in Windows. Then on the monitor I have hardware buttons where I can jump from Display P3 to Adobe RGB & sRGB.

 

From what I currently understand my best option is to do my photo edits using Display P3 hardware button on monitor and my Display P3 calibrated ICC profile to ensure I see as many colors possible, but when I i.e. export for social media (instagram/facebook) the recommended settings seem to be JPEG & sRGB color space:

  • How can I ensure my colors are accurately displayed when exporting to a different color space?
  • When I change from Display P3 to sRGB on my monitor hardware buttons I see quite a big different on my whites (way brighter on Display P3). Does this mean it will have the same darker whites when I export to JPEG sRGB color space? If so, should I be doing my editing in sRGB mode on the monitor when I know I will export to sRGB color space, or what are my best options ? Right now I'm worried if I edit using Display P3 and export to sRGB I will be making photos that are way darker than what I see when I edit

 

Basically I want to ensure I have the most colors I can available when editing while ensuring the colors in my exports (which usually are JPEG sRGB) are as accurate as possible. And with all these different profiles & settings I'm confused how to achieve this.

 

All input much appreciated. In advance, thank you.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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LrC has a Soft Proof tool in the Develop module that let's you see your image preveiw using any color profile (sRGB, Paper Profile, etc.).  What colorimeter and calibration software are you using? Make sure it is set to profile version v2 and type to Matrix, which is the most compatible with LrC. Calibrate the display for the widest gamut selectable (native is widest) and then use LrC Soft Proof for your preview of other color profiles.

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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Download and install the latest version of BenQ Palette Master 1.3.15 software from https://www.benq.com/en-ap/monitor/software/palette-master-element.html

 

The recommend choice of color space for setting up the monitor is Native.

 

 

This video should provide a lot of helpful info on BenQ Palette Master and SW321C, etc. The host has a lot more BenQ related videos. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rjRoIe0-mo

 

 

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Community Expert ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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You want the full gamut available (so DCI-P3) but you can and may wish to adjust other parameters for a close(er) soft proof to print viewing next tot he display. 

See:

Why are my prints too dark?
A video update to a written piece on subject from 2013
In this 24 minute video, I'll cover:

Are your prints really too dark?
Display calibration and WYSIWYG
Proper print viewing conditions
Trouble shooting to get a match
Avoiding kludges that don't solve the problem

High resolution: http://digitaldog.net/files/Why_are_my_prints_too_dark.mp4
Low resolution: https://youtu.be/iS6sjZmxjY4

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 12, 2022 Aug 12, 2022

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did you find any solution? 
I also changed my monitor to p3 100%, srgb more than 100% 
I use spyder 5 pro calibrator. After calibrating, my profile is calibrated p3. 

but when I export files to jpg (with p3 color profile) they look different in social media. 
 

Now, I use monitor with system defaul sRGB color profile, to be sure that it will look same in social media. 

I cant calibrate my monitor, it automatically makes p3 color profile... :S


 

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Community Expert ,
Aug 12, 2022 Aug 12, 2022

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The solution is social media that's color managed.

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Community Expert ,
Aug 12, 2022 Aug 12, 2022

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LATEST
@Besim.Mydyti wrote:

I cant calibrate my monitor, it automatically makes p3 color profile...


 

That is very common on the more affordable displays, since they don’t support full hardware calibration. Todd Shaner’s reply above has an answer that should work for any display that uses an accurate custom profile: Use soft-proofing in Lightroom Classic or Photoshop. With soft-proofing, you can preview how your image will look in sRGB even though you are using a P3 display.

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