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Batch editing in Lightroom Classic

New Here ,
Oct 29, 2019 Oct 29, 2019

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Hallo User,

I'm editing my great amount of holiday photos with LR CC. My problem is that there are allways the same run I want to shorten. The photos with the same exposure I can mark and work with batch editing, but then I have to open each photo to go to 'Photo/ Work in/Sharpener Pro 3:Output Sharpener'. And then save this photo after a short time. I would like to carry out this process with one button. Is there a possibility to do so in LR? If yes, does it work? Thanks a lot Paul

 

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Oct 29, 2019 Oct 29, 2019
With Lightroom Classic batch editing is very simple - partly because the program is built around it. You select the photos, ensure AutoSync is enabled, and drag the sliders. Give it a try.

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Adobe Employee ,
Oct 29, 2019 Oct 29, 2019

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Hi Paul,

 

Batch processing images through a plugin like the Sharpener Pro 3:Output Sharpener would not be possible in Lightroom Classic. You can however create an action in Photoshop and then use that to batch process the images through there.

You can check out the steps mentioned on page 14 of the PDF in the link below on how to create the action to include the Sharpener Pro 3:Output Sharpener.

http://www.doncastercameraclub.co.uk/resources/Sharpener-Pro-3-User-Guide.pdf

 

Let us know is that helps.

 

Regards,

Nikunj

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 29, 2019 Oct 29, 2019

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With Lightroom Classic batch editing is very simple - partly because the program is built around it.

You select the photos, ensure AutoSync is enabled, and drag the sliders. Give it a try.

 

Screen Shot 2019-10-29 at 14.34.27.png

 

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New Here ,
Nov 06, 2019 Nov 06, 2019

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Thanks a lot, it works

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LEGEND ,
Nov 06, 2019 Nov 06, 2019

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Don’t forget to disable auto-sync when you have finished to avoid future accidents.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 06, 2019 Nov 06, 2019

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Alterantively, leave Auto Sync enabled all the time.

At first you'll have an accident or two and adjust photos that you didn't intend to change. But you soon learn to keep an eye on how many photos are selected in the filmstrip, and on whether the button shows Previous or Auto Sync.

Some people just aren't able to work this way, but Auto Sync is the most efficient way to batch edit.

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New Here ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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How do I bathc autp,mate all photos, do i Select all, adhsut sliders accordisngly , then auto sysnc? Or can I select the underexposed photos, adjust sliders, then auto sunc, and the same for overexposed / Where does to "store" the altered photos, ? I ahvbe not used Lightroom before and its daunting ?

 

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Guru ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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In response to the question about how to use AutoSync: for adjustments done entirely within Lightroom, that is very simple. AutoSync is not a particular command, it is setting a different mode of working for Lightroom Classic as a whole. You might leave LrC in that mode indefinitely or you might terminate it, as you prefer.

 

Take for example imposing a particular Exposure, the same, onto a set of ten photos.

  • make sure AutoSync is already on, or if not, turn it on
  • select all ten photos
  • set the desired Exposure value

 

All ten photos now reflect this new Exposure, while in all other respects staying as they individually were.

 

Whenever only one photo is selected, AutoSync has got nothing to do. So whether it is turned on or off is a non-issue. It only matters when multiple photos are highlighted.

 

Two options of how to work:

  • leave AutoSync generally off, so you can safely relax about which images are or are not highlighted. If you do use AutoSync exceptionally, it is then incumbent on you to turn it off again immediately - to avoid unintended batch edits. 
  • leave AutoSync generally on, because you want to routinely edit in the batch. It is then incumbent on you to be constantly careful whether other images may be highlighted as well as the active image - since if there are, they will also get swept up into each new edit that you may apply to the active image.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2021 Aug 16, 2021

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"I ahvbe not used Lightroom before and its daunting ?"

 

So for now I would advise you to avoid AutoSync. Get the Quick Start from https://www.lightroomqueen.com/free-downloads/ , build up your LR experience, then take advantage of AutoSync.

 

In general, I recommend leaving AutoSync enabled all the time. This means you select all the photos that you want to adjust, then adjust the sliders - and AutoSync does the rest and copies the edits to all the selected photos. So if you have a mix of correctly exposed photos with bad WB, and underexposed photos with bad WB, you would select all the photos and correct the WB, then select just the latter group and correct exposure.

 

All the edits are stored in the catalogue.

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