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How can I INCREASE jpeg file size for an image with a white background?

New Here ,
May 10, 2018 May 10, 2018

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I am having the opposite issue as most people on this forum.

I need jpeg images above 3mb. I shoot in RAW, process, and when I export, even at 100%, they are below 1mb, usually in the 500kb rage. They are photos of bottles with an all white background and I don't know how to have them not compressed. Any tips on how to create larger file sizes would be appreciated!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2018 May 10, 2018

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I don't understand why you will blow up the file size of your jpegs. What do you want to achieve with this?

If you exported your RAW with the 100% setting and without a file size limit you get the best qualitiy you can get. There's no chance to get more.

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Advocate ,
May 11, 2018 May 11, 2018

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How did you arrive at the desired file size of 3 MB? File size is a meaningless metric outside of a specific context. The important numbers are IMAGE SIZE, width and height in pixels or total pixel resolution in Megapixels.

An uncompressed 8 bit image that is no more than a bit over 1 Mp - around 840 x 1260 pixels - would produce a 3 MB file in .tif format. Jpgs are always compressed, even when the Quality setting is 100, and the amount of actual compression depends on image content. Large areas of solid colored background would compress more and at Quality 100 the compression might be as much as 1:10.

However, if you are getting jpgs of only 0.5 MB, this sounds like the decompressed image would be no more than, say 5 to 6 MB which indicates an image size of only around 2 Mp, say 1200 x 1800 pixels. In this day and age when even Crop cameras run to 24 Mp and FF cameras can be twice that, this sounds like an awfully small image, one suitable for on-line display but not for a high quality print much more than 4x6 inches.

So the first question is what is your image size?

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LEGEND ,
May 11, 2018 May 11, 2018

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Agreeing with the others.

A 3MB requirement is nonsense. Expanding the photo to make it larger actually will decrease the quality.

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New Here ,
Feb 02, 2021 Feb 02, 2021

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This is really a simple request. What he's asking is how to increase the file size of a photo - not blow it up to make it bigger. Some stock photo agencies require a file size of at least 5Mb, and I am facing this puzzle myself.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 02, 2021 Feb 02, 2021

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This an utterly stupid request from so called stock agencies. The size of the document on a drive has little to do with anything; a 16bit TIFF, an 8-bit TIFF and an 8-bit JPEG (using what compression values) in Color then Grayscale will ALL have the same number of pixels and differing sizes on disk. The size an image takes up on disk is utterly meaninless. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" (pluralsight.com)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 02, 2021 Feb 02, 2021

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For JPEG files the quality level makes the most difference, but of course you said it’s already set to 100%.

 

After that, file complexity is a big factor. The more detail and noise, the larger the file. A photo with a large flat white background typically compresses very easily because it’s so simple, so it is hard to make that type of file larger.

 

taridonohue wrote:

What he's asking is how to increase the file size of a photo - not blow it up to make it bigger. Some stock photo agencies require a file size of at least 5Mb, and I am facing this puzzle myself.

 

To get a file larger than 3 to 5MB, it would help a lot if the file format could be TIFF or PSD instead of JPEG,  if the bit depth can be higher than 8 bits per channel, things like that. Can you post a URL of a stock submission web page where the file requirements are listed, or at least paste the complete submission requirements? It would help us see if there are aspects of the requirement that could be changed to achieve a higher file size.

 

If nothing else, the number of pixels could be artificially increased (by scaling up with Resample enabled).

 

Also, for clarity:

MB = megabyte, which is probably what they want.

Mb = megabit, which is only 1/8 of a megabyte so it is important to be use the right abbreviation.

 

Finally, I have to agree: A file size requirement is kind of ridiculous because it doesn’t indicate anything about image quality on its own. To have any meaning at all, a file size requirement needs the context of which file format, which color mode (file size is different for RGB vs CMYK), what bit depth, what compression level, what pixel dimensions… Otherwise it’s too easy to take a terrible picture, futz with some technical option to artificially bloat up the file size, and send it in. We know it isn’t you that requires a certain file size, but it does need to be said that file size has no meaning on its own.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 04, 2021 Feb 04, 2021

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You could try adding noise (or grain) to the white background. This would make the JPEG compression less efficient and would result in a larger file size.

 

It's a dumb workaround for a silly requirement, but if you need a bigger filesize, that could help!

 

 

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