Importing LR Classic to PS 2022 leaves issue with non-linear lines in image

New Here ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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Hi All, 

 

I am facing an issue with importing an image from Lightroom Classic (11.2) into Photoshop 2022 (23.2.2).

After import in PS I see non-linear lines on the bottom side of the image which persist when exporting them from PS as JPG as well. Screenshots attached. 

These lines were not visible in LR, but when exporting from LR I actually see them as well.

 

Anybody knows what this is, is it an exporting bug?

Could I be doing something wrong?

Can I avoid this?

 

Help would greatly be appreciated!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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What camera? These could be compression artefacts (increase your jpeg quality), or could be caused by lens correction. Turn off lens correction. For some cameras (mirrorless cameras such as Z7, etc.) in Lightroom and in ACR you cannot turn off lens correction and thiss can cause these curved artefacts

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New Here ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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Thanks for the response!

 

It's a Nikon D850, the export quality was already 100%, it's a 42,8MB file.

I have turned off the Lens correction and the problem persists (image below), although it seems less apparent and mostly lower in the image. Might also be less visible due to the fact that the Lens correction reduces the brightness in the lower corners.

 

Any more ideas?

 

Screenshot 2022-04-03 233500 after turning off lens correction.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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It's possible that some of the artefacts are real and present in the original data. This sometimes happens to me in deep blue skies and is caused by the red and/or green channels being very low. It can also be a color management issue where if you have an 8-bit file and are using an 8-bit display with another 8-bit display color profile, you can get slight bit errors that can cause posterization. That's something you probably cannot get rid of when using jpeg files no matter how high you set the quality. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 03, 2022 Apr 03, 2022

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Forgot to mention that one way you can sometimes get rid of these bit-depth posterization issues due to conversion to lower bit depth is to add a small amount of noise/grain to the image

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