Mark files

Engaged ,
Mar 10, 2022 Mar 10, 2022

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Is there a way to mark files so that mark shows up in finder or other searches?

I flagged a whole bunch of items,  but when i want to pick them out for

Premiere Pro, it does not show which items.

 Mac OS 121.1

LR 11.2

Thanks, steve Zee

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 10, 2022 Mar 10, 2022

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Any of the ratings, flags or picks can easily be filtered on. 

You could also use the Quick Collection and add files using B. In fact you could make custom collections and use 'Set as Target Collection' when to create them. The B key then adds (or removes) from the collection. 

Sean McCormack. Author. Magazine Writer. Official Fuji X-Photographer.

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Engaged ,
Mar 10, 2022 Mar 10, 2022

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Does this mean finder and other apps will see that?

Thanks

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 10, 2022 Mar 10, 2022

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You export the files to a folder for other apps to use. You can save the metadata, which will embed in rendered files, and be am XMP sidecar file for Raw, which is readable by other programs. 

Sean McCormack. Author. Magazine Writer. Official Fuji X-Photographer.

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Engaged ,
Mar 10, 2022 Mar 10, 2022

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What @SeanMcCormack said is all true, but I'm not sure it hit on everything you were asking.

 

I don't think any of the LrC ratings, flags, etc. will show up in Finder.  You'd have to do all your marking and filtering in LrC and then export those files somewhere to use in Premiere.  And as far as I know, Premiere doesn't support raw still image formats, so if you're using those, you'd need to export them to another format to use in Premiere anyways.

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LEGEND ,
Mar 11, 2022 Mar 11, 2022

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[This post contains formatting and embedded images that don't appear in email. View the post in your Web browser.]

 

If you don't want to export the chosen items (not the speediest operation in LR), there's a somewhat kludgy way to mark the photos in LR: Select all of them and in the Metadata > IPTC panel, set Headline to contain "x".  Then in Finder, search for files with the Headline containing "x":

 

johnrellis_0-1647039350658.png

 

You could save away that search query as a Finder "smart folder".  I've always found the Finder's search user interface arcane and klunky and only use it perhaps a couple times a year. But with a minute or two of futzing I can figure it out again.

 

Note that Finder claims to search "Rating", but that doesn't appear to be the industry standard EXIF Rating.

 

These are the photo metadata fields that Finder appears to know about, so you could use one of them instead:

johnrellis_1-1647039656192.png

 

 

 

 

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LEGEND ,
Mar 11, 2022 Mar 11, 2022

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I forgot to add: You'll need to enable the option Catalog Settings > Metadata > Automatically Write Changes Into XMP.

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Engaged ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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Thanks everyone for helping.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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As mentioned, use in Premiere Pro would AFAICT almost certainly involve exported file copies - showing the results of your editing in Lightroom Classic, and written out under a colourspace / pixel dimensions / file format suitable for that usage.

 

The imported source image files don't themselves have the above, usage-suitable attributes.

 

One approach is to mark exported files for a particular purpose with a dedicated keyword inside LrC, that is then included at export / Publish. This keyword on the produced files - sometimes also referred to as a "tag" - can then be searched for within Finder.

 

But keyword aside, you can't ever know an export is technically suitable, except when you make it in direct response to a known usage requirement.

 

So, if you have an envisaged project in Premiere Pro for which you are selecting images within LrC, I suggest you directly export just those needed images, to the suitable specification, into a new folder made for that purpose. Complete your project using this folder, then delete the whole folder once the need for these specially exported images has passed. That's the cleanest way IMO. Best to regard exports as usage-specific, ephemeral, and disposable / overwritable.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 15, 2022 Mar 15, 2022

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The main problem here is how Apple designed the Mac Finder. As everyone else has showed, the Mac Finder just doesn't show a lot of standard IPTC metadata. Other applications do; there are many non-Adobe photo applications on the Mac that will happily exchange star ratings, captions, sometimes labels, and more with Lightroom Classic. It’s just that the Finder doesn’t.

 

There are a couple of ways out of this.

 

The screen shots in John Ellis’ post show one way: Keywords. The Mac Finder can recognize IPTC keywords embedded in images. For example, you could use Lightroom Classic to mark all of the photos you want to use in Premiere Pro with the keyword "@PremierePro". If you do that, you can do two things in the Finder: You can see the keywords in Get Info, and you can instantly collect all of the images with specific keywords by creating a Smart Folder as John showed.

 

The other way you might consider is the way I do it:

Skip the Finder entirely, and even skip the Import command in Premiere Pro.

 

When I want to use still images from Lightroom Classic in a Premiere Pro sequence, I take advantage of the fact that both Lightroom Classic and Premiere Pro support standard Mac drag-and-drop. So what I do is organize the photos into a Collection in Lightroom Classic, then with that collection selected, switch to Grid view. Select all of the images, drag them, and simply drop them all directly into the Project window in Premiere Pro. Premiere Pro imports them without a fuss.

 

Important: For either method to work, the images must already be in a non-raw format compatible with Premiere Pro. For example:

•  With the keyword method, if you add keywords to raw images in Lightroom Classic, the keywords will not be exposed to the Finder. The Finder can see keywords only if they are embedded in the file itself…not in an application’s database, not in an XMP sidecar file. If the images you are working with in Lightroom Classic are already JPEG, you can use the Save Metadata to File command to embed the keywords into the JPEG files so that the Finder can see them.

•  With the drag-and-drop method, if you drag raw or TIFF images, Premiere Pro will not accept them.

 

To address both of those issues, if the images are not already in JPEG format, you will need to export them to JPEG for use in Premiere Pro, embedding metadata on export if needed. I like to have those derivatives available for quick retrieval in Lightroom Classic for drag-and-drop, so on export I select “Add to This Catalog.”

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 16, 2022 Mar 16, 2022

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Try using Adobe Bridge. It is Finder-like and can read most of LR's metadata (but not flags) after a Cmd S.

 

On Mac, you can also drag items out of Bridge and drop them into a Premiere Pro project. But you can also do this with LR, so why not do your searching and filtering entirely in LR and drag and drop to Premiere Pro?

 

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