mehr Bildrauschen nach Lightroom-Export

New Here ,
Nov 29, 2021 Nov 29, 2021

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Guten Abend Zusammen!

Ich habe heute folgendes festgestellt: Wenn ich ein RAW-Bild in Lightroom Classic-Version 11.0.1, Camera-RAW 14.0 (Windows 11) fertig bearbeitet habe und es exportieren (JPG, Quali 100%, Lange Kante 2500px, keine Nachbearbeitung und Schärfen aus) will, habe ich im anschließenden JPG mehr Bildrauschen als in der Vorschau im LR Entwickeln-Modul. Auch die Tiefen sind heller. 

 

Beispiel, Screenshot aus LR-Entwickeln-Modul:

https://imgur.com/a/Y9IRBjk

 

Beispiel, Screenshot nach Export:

https://imgur.com/a/Zcyzh7G

 

Hat jemand eine Idee woran das liegen könnte?

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Dec 04, 2021 Dec 04, 2021
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I noticed the following today: When I finished editing a RAW image in Lightroom Classic version 11.0.1, Camera RAW 14.0 (Windows 11) and want to export it (JPG, Quali 100%, Long Edge 2500px, no post-processing and sharpening off), I have more image noise in the subsequent JPG than in the preview in the LR Develop module. The depths are also brighter.

 

To evaluate noise and sharpness (as well as chromatic aberration and moiré), you MUST view the image at 100%.

At this view, one image pixel is

...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 04, 2021 Dec 04, 2021

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quote

I noticed the following today: When I finished editing a RAW image in Lightroom Classic version 11.0.1, Camera RAW 14.0 (Windows 11) and want to export it (JPG, Quali 100%, Long Edge 2500px, no post-processing and sharpening off), I have more image noise in the subsequent JPG than in the preview in the LR Develop module. The depths are also brighter.

 

To evaluate noise and sharpness (as well as chromatic aberration and moiré), you MUST view the image at 100%.

At this view, one image pixel is represented by one screen pixel, giving you a true impression of the image.

(if you have high resolution monitor, you may need to use 200%)

Any other magnification will be inaccurate and misleading, because the image has been scaled.

Different applications use different algorithms for scaling, so viewing the same image at for instance 48% in two different applications may give you different results. But at 100%, all applications will display identically.

 

So start out by viewing the original at 100% in Lightroom, and then view the exported image at 100% as well.

If the exported image is posted on the web, it might get scaled to fit in the browser window, and the appearance will change, depending on the browser, the magnification, and the pixel density of the monitor/device.

 

When posting images on this forum, please use the Insert Photos button in the toolbar.

 

Insert-photos.png

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New Here ,
Dec 08, 2021 Dec 08, 2021

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Hi Per,

 

that actually solved my problem! It really was a problem with the different zoom-levels. At the same zoom-levels there is exact the same amount of grain.

 

Thank you very much 🙂

 

Best regards, Flo 

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