Old version of LR

New Here ,
Feb 04, 2022 Feb 04, 2022

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I was very comfortable with older version of Lightroom. I liked the dodge and burn in the older version. Never liked masking and other stuff which is why I never worked on PS. how do I go back to old version of LR?

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Adobe Employee ,
Feb 05, 2022 Feb 05, 2022

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Hi there,

Thanks for sharing your feedback. You may install Lightroom Classic's previous version from here: https://helpx.adobe.com/download-install/using/install-previous-version.html

 

Regards,
Sahil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 05, 2022 Feb 05, 2022

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To which old version you'll go back?

In the Creative Cloud Client you can go back only one version.

If you wish to go back to an older version you have to look here: DDL Articles at ProDesignTools

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 05, 2022 Feb 05, 2022

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quote

I liked the dodge and burn in the older version. Never liked masking and other stuff which is why I never worked on PS. how do I go back to old version of LR?


By @Parimala

 

If you by "dodge and burn" mean using the adjustment brush to brighten or darken parts of the image, it's still there. And the old keyboard shortcut still works, press K to bring it up.

All the old tools are there, as well as some new ones, like Select sky and Select subject.

See https://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom-classic/help/masking.html

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 05, 2022 Feb 05, 2022

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It is worth remembering that older versions of Lightroom can't be expected to stay usable forever, regardless that you may still be licensed to do so. Updates to your computer's operating system (or replacing it with a newer one) may eventually mean the older software no longer runs.

 

So far as adapting to the new Lightroom local adjustments: if your prior usage was "dodge and burn" then you can continue to use the Brush in almost exactly those same ways - only, the interface is slightly different.

 

I suggest:

  • Starting from Develop, press K to open the local adjustments with Brush tool active, ready to go. So this key takes you to the exact same point, in effect, as clicking the old brush icon would have done.
  • Your current default adjustments / preset are seen. As before, if you now change these before you click on the image to start brushing, those default adjustments update. If you do so after you start brushing, that change affects only this one pin.
  • After pressing K key you are busy placing a new pin: your first click on the image will locate this. If you want to work on one of the other prior pins instead, press Escape key. This cancels out of placing a new pin, so all those other prior pins become visible.
  • In this state you can press Escape key a second time, to exit local adjustment mode altogether.
  • The appearance of the "pins" is changed: since different types of adjustment are now seen together. These now have distinct icons. Also, each is listed in the new Mask panel. You can assign these memorable names, if you want - a definite improvement IMO. Click to select one or another, either in the Masks panel or else in the image, to then add more brushing or erase some previous brushing.
  • Formerly you could reduce / increase the adjustment 'amount' of a given adjustment by dragging left and right on its pin. Now doing this just moves the adjustment around - so you need to also hold Alt key (Windows, I expect this is Option key on Mac). Otherwise an Amount slider is seen in the local adjustment panel when it is in its collapsed mode. Either method is moving all sliders proportionally closer to, or further away from, their respective zero points. 
  • To start a new, independent brushed adjustment, you can press K again.

 

If you don't want as yet, to engage fully with the interface of the new Masks panel - then you don't have to.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 05, 2022 Feb 05, 2022

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A new feature to mention: if you often use the same local adjustment approach on a photo - for example if you are accustomed to having a "dodge" and also a "burn" of some sort, even though their brushed areas will of course differ from photo to photo - you can in one click add those to a new photo, all set up ready to go. 

 

On a sample photo, press K on the keyboard then start a new brushed adjustment. Name this "dodge" in the Masks panel and set its adjustment to a lightening effect. Press K again, make another, name this  one "burn" in the Masks panel and set its adjustment to a darkening effect. Erase out the initial brush stroke for both of these. In the (main Develop, not local adjustment) Presets panel make a new user preset and name this "add dodge and burn". For the action of this preset, uncheck everything except the "dodge" and "burn" masks - which are listed by name.

 

Using this preset on any other photo will add into it copies of these two empty brush "layers", already equipped with their respective starting-point adjustments. You can activate either one by name, so it doesn't particularly matter whereabouts in the image their pins are. Then brush on as required.

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