photos darker on ipad when editing

New Here ,
Mar 19, 2022 Mar 19, 2022

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I need help, I do not like to edit on my computer all the time so I started syncing and using my ipad.  The photos look TOTALLY different on my computer when I export, they are so much darker and unusable.  How can I make sure that what I am editing on the ipad exports the same so I am not doing the work twice? 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 19, 2022 Mar 19, 2022

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Images display more consistently on two different displays when:

A) The image has an embedded color profile.

B) Both displays are used with an application and system that support color profiles.

C) Both displays are calibrated, or at least profiled.

D) Both displays can reproduce color similarly.

E) Both displays use settings consistent with their color profiles.

 

If any one of those things is not correct, there is no guarantee of a match.

 

So, to figure this out:

 

A) If the image was exported from Lightroom, it will have an embedded color profile, which is good.

 

B) The iPad shows the photo in Lightroom in iPad OS. Both that app and that system properly support color profiles, so there, it’s OK. But on the laptop, there are lots of questions. The laptop shows the photo in Facebook, which is in a web browser. For the photo to display consistently with Lightroom on iPad, on your laptop Facebook must be displaying inside a web browser that uses color profiles. I am not sure which one it is, is it Microsoft Edge? If so, the current version should be OK. And Windows should support color profiles as well, but that depends on whether the laptop’s display profile is set up properly in the Display settings.

 

C) The iPad is factory calibrated so that it is reasonably (but probably not perfectly) accurate. The Lenovo display? Not sure how good it is, unless you used a color profiling/calibration device to create a custom profile of it. If not, it could be off.

 

D) The iPad display is capable of reproducing P3 wide gamut color. The Lenovo display? You will have to look it up. Many affordable Windows laptops are capable of only the smaller sRGB color gamut, and may have a different contrast range or color accuracy than an iPad display. That would make it hard for the photo to match on both.

 

E) Did you make sure both displays are set the same way? For example, if the iPad display is set to a different brightness level than the laptop, of course they will look different. And not brightness as seen by eye, but as objectively measured. So if both are set to, for example, 120 cdm^2 as measured by a color sensor, then if everything before is also correct then they should look like the match closely enough.

 

But realistically, it looks like with these two displays you might be able to get it close, but it could be impossible to match them exactly. And even if you could make them match on two devices you control, the photo will probably look a little different for everybody else when they look at the photo on their own displays, because they’re all over the place, on screens of different levels of quality using all kinds of different settings.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 20, 2022 Mar 20, 2022

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Conrad is completely correct. It is highly likely your computer display is way off so that needs to be fixed first. Make sure to calibrate to a reasonable brightness. The brightness you want depends on the lighting in your room. Screen with a full white document should look similar to a white piece of paper. Second, make sure on your iPad, you disable True Tone and night shift. Those mess with the color and again use a reasonable brightness setting for the situation you are in. If you calibrate your desktop correctly and disable these features on your iPad, you will get quite good correspondence between the two.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 20, 2022 Mar 20, 2022

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@Jao vdL wrote:

…make sure on your iPad, you disable True Tone and night shift. Those mess with the color….


 

Ohhhh…I forgot to mention those, good call. Those are good examples of display settings that would change how the display behaves, especially if you are also looking at other displays that either do have those options but they’re set differently, or don’t have those options. I think the Windows equivalent of iOS Night Shift is called Night Light, you should disable it on the Windows side too if it's there.

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