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Surchauffe MacBook avec Lightroom et Ecran Externe

New Here ,
Nov 20, 2021 Nov 20, 2021

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Bonjour. J'ai acquis un MacBook 16'' neuf il y a 4 mois. Depuis le premier allumage, il surchauffe simplement en utilisant un écran externe. Et lorsque j'utilise Lightroom il surchauffe alors considérablement. Ceci implique que Lightroom , Photoshop, Touch Bar etc ... ne fonctionnent pas correctement. Tous les tests de profondeurs de la machine ont été fait chez Apple Store Brussels Toison D'or. Ils n'ont rien trouvé d'anormal à la machine ! Pourtant le problème de surchauffe existe bien avec les disfonctionnements que cela occasionne. Possible qu'il y ai une incompatibité entre cette machine, les Ecrans Externes et les Applications Adobe ?  Lorsque je n'utilise pas l'écran Externe avec les applications Adobes, la machine semble fonctionner normalment et ne chauffe pas. Quelqu'un peut m'aider ? D'avance merci.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 20, 2021 Nov 20, 2021

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Moving thread to the Lightroom Classic forum from Using the Community

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 20, 2021 Nov 20, 2021

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The issue is not related to Lightroom, Photoshop or any other software. It's due to the GPU when using an external monitor. This link will take you to a thread on another forum where it has been discussed at great length since November 2019 https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/2019-16-is-hot-noisy-with-an-external-monitor.2211747/

 

 

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LEGEND ,
Nov 20, 2021 Nov 20, 2021

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To build on Ian's reply, more generally Macbooks have long had issues with running hot and then slowing down as a result, especially when running apps like LR that use the CPU and GPU much more heavily than the typical app. 

 

I rest my Macbook Pro 2019 15" on two thin strips of corrugated cardboard, raising it off the desk by about 3/16", which helps a fair bit. I've never tried them, but many people say that laptop cooling pads can help too:

https://smile.amazon.com/s?k=laptop+cooling+pad&ref=nb_sb_noss_2 

 

Blame Apple for the design flaw -- they prioritize thin form factors over properly cooled hardware.  (I've read that the latest Apple Silicon Macbook Pros have gotten a little bit thicker to allow for traditional USB and card reader ports again -- maybe they'll have better cooling too.)

 

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New Here ,
Nov 22, 2021 Nov 22, 2021

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Merci pour votre réponse John. En admettant qu'il est normal que le MacBook 16'' chauffe assez fort, je me demande tout de même si il est normal que le bloc d'alimentation et le hub de connexion des péfiphériques chauffent aussi assez fort, et si la surchauffe de la machine n'empêche pas le fonctionnement noraml de certains logiciels comme Lightroom ? Bien à vous.

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LEGEND ,
Nov 22, 2021 Nov 22, 2021

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"if it is normal that the power supply and the connection hub of the pefipherics also heat up quite strongly"

 

LR uses a lot more power than the typical app (even Photoshop), so it wouldn't surprise me that the power adapter gets hotter. I haven't see any reports about heating of hubs. I have used several models of Caldigit Thunderbolt hubs without issue.

 

"if the overheating of the machine does not prevent the noraml operation of some software like Lightroom"

 

I and many others have observed that the heating can slow down the entire machine as the chip firmware and Mac OS throttle back the clock speed to control temperature.  And if the computer truly over-heats, the chip firmware will shut it down abruptly without warning. That typically only happens when the fans are clogged with dust or otherwise not working. I assume that when you took your computer to the Apple Store, they checked for that.

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New Here ,
Nov 22, 2021 Nov 22, 2021

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Hello John, 

Oui chez Apple ils ont vérifié tout cela et ils me disent que la machine fonctionne tout à fait normalement. Je n'arrive toujours pas à le croire, mais en attendant je vais essayer de m'habituer à travailler avec un MacBook qui me sert aussi de chauffage !! 🙂 Bonne soirée à vous et encore merci pour votre réactivité à mes demandes.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 22, 2021 Nov 22, 2021

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@johnrellis wrote:

To build on Ian's reply, more generally Macbooks have long had issues with running hot and then slowing down as a result, especially when running apps like LR that use the CPU and GPU much more heavily than the typical app. …

 

…Blame Apple for the design flaw -- they prioritize thin form factors over properly cooled hardware.  (I've read that the latest Apple Silicon Macbook Pros have gotten a little bit thicker to allow for traditional USB and card reader ports again -- maybe they'll have better cooling too.)


 

The Apple Silicon MacBook Pro is greatly improved in this regard, but it isn’t just because of the thickness or the cooling system. It’s because of Apple Silicon itself. In short, the M1 processor uses so much less energy that to reach the same performance level as an Intel processor, the M1 rarely gets hot or noisy. Even at full load, if the fans need to start up, they can usually keep the temperature down at just 1/3 maximum fan speed.

 

@defaultvh01m39azhax wrote: 

Oui chez Apple ils ont vérifié tout cela et ils me disent que la machine fonctionne tout à fait normalement. Je n'arrive toujours pas à le croire, mais en attendant je vais essayer de m'habituer à travailler avec un MacBook qui me sert aussi de chauffage !!


 

Unforunately, your Intel MacBook Pro is working normally…for an Intel MacBook Pro, when all CPUs are used at full power in any application. In Lightroom, it happens when building previews or exporting; you want the maximum power of the CPU applied to your work. The problem is that the Intel CPU produces so much heat that the Mac’s cooling system can barely keep up when the cooling fans are at their top speed (and top noise level).

 

Fortunately, those problems are all solved on the current MacBook Pro line based on Apple Silicon. It is true that your 16" MacBook Pro is only four months old, but the 16" Apple Silicon MacBook Pro that was just released last month is a radically improved computer. If you are willing to trade in/sell your Intel 16" MacBook Pro for a current Apple Silicon 16" MacBook Pro M1 Pro or M1 Max, you should find faster performance that is no longer limited by heat. You can let Lightroom Classic push the CPU to its limit, and the laptop will be cool and silent (or near-silent if the fans spin up). I am using a 14" MacBook Pro M1 Pro connected to two external displays, and even when busy in Lightroom Classic, it does not get hot.

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