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batch change exposure by delta

New Here ,
Jul 16, 2020

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hi, 

 

my pictures are often underexposed. when I print them, the result is often much darker than on screen.

I'd like to apply a +0.5 exposure to all pictures of a catalogue. not to give them all the same absolute exposure, but to give them an addtional +0.5 exposure on each.

I now that in library / quick development, I can add such relative exposure to a picture (right arrow). 

but It doesn't apply to multiple selection.

with "synchronize parameters", I have the opposite problem: it does apply a change to all selected pictures, but not a relative +0.5 exposure (it basically align all exposures).

does anyone know how to do what I'm looking for?

thx.

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batch change exposure by delta

New Here ,
Jul 16, 2020

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hi, 

 

my pictures are often underexposed. when I print them, the result is often much darker than on screen.

I'd like to apply a +0.5 exposure to all pictures of a catalogue. not to give them all the same absolute exposure, but to give them an addtional +0.5 exposure on each.

I now that in library / quick development, I can add such relative exposure to a picture (right arrow). 

but It doesn't apply to multiple selection.

with "synchronize parameters", I have the opposite problem: it does apply a change to all selected pictures, but not a relative +0.5 exposure (it basically align all exposures).

does anyone know how to do what I'm looking for?

thx.

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How to, Sync

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64

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 16, 2020

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If your prints are too dark, your screen is too bright.

Reduce the brightness of your screen to match the prints, or even better, calibrate your monitor with a hardware calibrator, with brightness set to 100 - 120 candela. This will also create a custom monitor profile, which describes your monitor accurately. With an accurate monitor profile, Lightroom will display your images accurately. Then use the correct printing profile for your printer/paper combination, and the prints should be quite close to what you see on screen.

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New Here ,
Jul 16, 2020

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will do, thanks.

but what if I want to correct a large quantity of picutres afterwards (as all of my previous ones were improperly corrected. Is there anyway to do the bath adaptation I mention in my question?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 16, 2020

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Per is right that you shouldn't do this. You should calibrate your screen correctly and view your prints using good lighting. That said, if you select multiple images and hit the + or - in quick develop, it should apply to all selected images as a relative adjustment as long as you are in grid view

 

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New Here ,
Jul 16, 2020

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it works !

thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 16, 2020

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This idea of a delta is counter productive. 

First, you don't really know your raws at least, are over or under exposed via LR. It doesn't provide that data. You need to view a raw Histogram via something like RawDigger to nail actual exposure. 

Next, any rendering in LR can appear 'over exposed' or 'under exposed' when the source data may not be because of the current rendering settings. Below is a good primer about this from Jeff Schewe to look over. 

If you calibrate the display to actually match a print, they match and the print doesn't look 'too dark' compared to the print. 

See:

Why are my prints too dark?
Schewe article on Exposure: 
Why are my prints too dark? A video update to a written piece on subject from 2010 In this 24 minute video, I'll cover: Are your prints really too dark? Disp...

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Participant ,
Jul 17, 2020

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No, I am sorry. Interesting approach but I do not know how to do this.

Best Regards
Eric Pecquerie
Sent from my iPad Pro

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LEGEND ,
Jul 17, 2020

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 Dont know how to do what?

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