Export files in Lightroom

New Here ,
May 11, 2021 May 11, 2021

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Hi,

What settings do I need when I export a file in Lightroom to be able to print large images such as 3x2 meters?

I shoot in RAW and have a Nikon Z7. Are there any settings I should consider having in the camera?

Is it possible to make a preset in Lightroom, so I do not have to fill in "export file" every time?

 

Best regards / Madeleine

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How to, Import and export

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Engaged ,
May 11, 2021 May 11, 2021

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Here are some suggestions but what I would recommend talking with the print service you are going to use. They will likely have some valuable guidance. Also Google other resources on the subject:

 

  • Pixel Size Calculator - There are numerous ones out there. Here's one.   It shows you need 21,260 x 14,173 pixes. It looks like the Z7 has a resolution of 8,280 x 5,520 pixels so you will need to extrapolate .
  • Extrapolation - Lightroom can extrapolate from your image size to the print size. Check the quality. If not happy, check out the new Adobe Super Resolution for ACR
  • Viewing Distance - How far back will people normally be to view this print. See here for a discussion.

 

You can also just try it and see what the results look like. In Export, set the dimensions, PPI print then try exporting with and without "Don't Enlarge" enabled to see how big your image can be without extrapolation.

 

DS256_0-1620731906335.png

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 11, 2021 May 11, 2021

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@DS256 Your 'Pixel Size Calculator' link goes to "Page Not Found"

Perhaps this is the one you are suggesting-

https://www.nationsphotolab.com/pixelchart.aspx

And your "Viewing Distance" discussion link? seems not to work at all (with Firefox browser).

Maybe this one instead-

http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/what-print-resolution-works-for-what-viewing-distance/

 

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 10.3, Photoshop 22.4.2, Lightroom 4.3, Windows-10 Nikon DSLR.

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Engaged ,
May 11, 2021 May 11, 2021

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Thanks for letting me know @WobertC 

 

Turns out for the Pixel Calculator, I somehow got a period in the URL. Here's the actual URL https://www.omnicalculator.com/other/pixels-to-print-size

 

The Viewing Distance also had a malform link. Here's the corrected one https://www.digitalphotopro.com/technique/photography-workflow/the-right-resolution/

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 11, 2021 May 11, 2021

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Print it exactly as it is. There is no need for any upsampling. The Z7 has enough pixels for anything, from magazine spread to roadside billboard.

 

Upsampling, by any method, will always reduce perceived quality. It will never improve anything. At best, it makes you feel better for having more pixels, but it does nothing for the image.

 

And it's not necessary. The only justification for upsampling, ever, is if you get visible pixels. You have to zoom in pretty close to a Z7 file before you see any pixels - or study a 2x3 meter print with a strong magnifying glass from up close.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

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At 300 x 200 cm, the PPI will be 69.9, which will be fine for that size.

You can use Image size in Photoshop with Resample unchecked to see the PPI (image below), or just do the math.

300 x  200 cm = 118.11 x 78.74 inches. (divide cm by 2.54)

Pixel dimensions divided by dimensions in inches = PPI.

PPI stands for Pixels Per Inch – the number of image pixels used to print 1 inch on paper.

 

image_2021-05-12_103306.png

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Engaged ,
May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

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Here's an older article on understanding the difference between DPI and PPI. https://community.adobe.com/t5/lightroom-classic/the-confusion-trail-caused-by-dpi-versus-ppi-resolu...

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

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Some more information on the Adobe Super Resolution feature DS256 mentioned.

 

A 3x2 meter (118 inch x 79 inch) is a good candidate for the new Adobe Super Resolution feature available in Camera Raw. The Nikon Z7 is 8256 x 5504 px, which is 70 pixels per inch (ppi) at this print size. The new Super Resolution feature upscales the image by a factor of 2x, which increases resolution to 140 ppi, with very little if any loss in image quality (see below article). This gets a lot closer to the 300 ppi target for most printers used by outside print services. It's also probably adequate for the viewing distance normally used for a print that large.

 

https://blog.adobe.com/en/publish/2021/03/10/from-the-acr-team-super-resolution.html#gs.0mw0ds

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 12, 2021 May 12, 2021

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I agree with Per that 70 ppi is plenty enough at this size, which will be viewed from a distance.

 

Keep in mind that a "traditional" monitor has about that resolution. We all agree that text can be a bit grainy on these monitors compared to a modern UHD/4K, but no one ever complained that they could see pixels. And that's from a desktop away.

 

It's much more important that the image is of excellent photographic quality, and optimally sharpened for the purpose.

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