Extract embedded camera profile from jpeg and apply to raw files?

Community Beginner ,
Jul 09, 2017

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Given a jpeg file with an embedded camera profile, is it possible to extract that profile so it can be applied to any raw file?    

The purpose is to obtain the profile that's used by the manufacturer (in this case Sony, for the A9) when creating in-camera jpegs, so I can apply it to raw files.  

I have tried the following on a jpeg image of the ColorChecker Passport:  (a)  convert the jpeg to dng; (b) run (desktop)  colorchecker on the resulting dng.  But this fails with "not a valid dng".

js

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Correct answer by JimHess | Adobe Community Professional

No, my mistake. There used to be a DNG profile editor available. But apparently it isn't readily available anymore. At least I'm not able to find it. It was possible to use a DNG file to customize a profile to use with any raw file. I never tried it myself. What I have done personally is photographed a "typical" scene of what I like to photograph most often. I like to do a lot of landscapes. I process that image to how I think it should look when it is first imported. Then I save new camera defaults for that camera. Those settings will then be applied whenever I import new images into Lightroom. Of course, that isn't going to cover all conditions. But it does seem to expedite the postprocessing for me.

Perhaps someone else has a link for the DNG Profile Editor. I know it used to be available, but I just don't seem to be able to locate it anymore.

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Extract embedded camera profile from jpeg and apply to raw files?

Community Beginner ,
Jul 09, 2017

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Given a jpeg file with an embedded camera profile, is it possible to extract that profile so it can be applied to any raw file?    

The purpose is to obtain the profile that's used by the manufacturer (in this case Sony, for the A9) when creating in-camera jpegs, so I can apply it to raw files.  

I have tried the following on a jpeg image of the ColorChecker Passport:  (a)  convert the jpeg to dng; (b) run (desktop)  colorchecker on the resulting dng.  But this fails with "not a valid dng".

js

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by JimHess | Adobe Community Professional

No, my mistake. There used to be a DNG profile editor available. But apparently it isn't readily available anymore. At least I'm not able to find it. It was possible to use a DNG file to customize a profile to use with any raw file. I never tried it myself. What I have done personally is photographed a "typical" scene of what I like to photograph most often. I like to do a lot of landscapes. I process that image to how I think it should look when it is first imported. Then I save new camera defaults for that camera. Those settings will then be applied whenever I import new images into Lightroom. Of course, that isn't going to cover all conditions. But it does seem to expedite the postprocessing for me.

Perhaps someone else has a link for the DNG Profile Editor. I know it used to be available, but I just don't seem to be able to locate it anymore.

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Jul 09, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2017

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Sounds like a good idea, but it just won't work. It's like trying to take a cooked egg and making it raw again. There is no profile in a JPEG image that can be extracted in any way, unfortunately. One thing you could do is program your camera to shoot JPEG and raw and then adjust the raw to match the JPEG as closely as possible. Then create a preset using those settings. Or use the DNG profile creator (which I have never tried) to match the JPEG. Nice try, but unfortunately it just won't work.

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Jul 09, 2017 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 09, 2017

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I started just as you suggest - adjusting a raw to match a corresponding jpeg, but it was laborious and never the match I would like. 

I'm not sure what you meant by "use the DNG profile creator" - do you mean something different from taking a (raw) image of the ColorChecker Passport and creating a camera profile from that (which I did try, but applying the result to raw files wasn't a particularly close match to the jpeg with embedded profile? 

js

P.S.  "making a cooked egg raw again" - nice analogy! 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2017

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No, my mistake. There used to be a DNG profile editor available. But apparently it isn't readily available anymore. At least I'm not able to find it. It was possible to use a DNG file to customize a profile to use with any raw file. I never tried it myself. What I have done personally is photographed a "typical" scene of what I like to photograph most often. I like to do a lot of landscapes. I process that image to how I think it should look when it is first imported. Then I save new camera defaults for that camera. Those settings will then be applied whenever I import new images into Lightroom. Of course, that isn't going to cover all conditions. But it does seem to expedite the postprocessing for me.

Perhaps someone else has a link for the DNG Profile Editor. I know it used to be available, but I just don't seem to be able to locate it anymore.

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Jul 09, 2017 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 09, 2017

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Jim

There are DNG Profile Editors and other utilities here.  No sure they will run on a new OS!!!!

Digital Negative (DNG), Adobe DNG Converter | Adobe Photoshop CC

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Jul 09, 2017 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 09, 2017

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That's been my approach to date (adjust typical scene; save as a preset for subsequent use).   But I just got a Sony A9 and am impressed by the color rendering of (in-camera) jpegs, so have been trying to match it. 

Also, my understanding of the built-in profiles you can select in the LR "Camera Calibration" panel is that the ones prefixed by "Camera" (e.g., Camera Standard) are actually camera-specific (in this case for the Sony A9).  Indeed, the "Camera Standard" profile yields the best results (i.e., closest to the look of in-camera jpegs) - indeed, considerably closer than the (default) "Adobe Standard".   My best results so far are from that approach - applying "Camera Standard" to a typical scene, and tweaking from there prior to saving a preset.

Thanks for your input. 

js

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Jul 09, 2017 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 09, 2017

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Jul 09, 2017 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2017

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I have actually done something along the lines you suggest, but for Fuji - a plugin called X-LR - and it required figuring out how Fuji stores settings in the raw files. I have something similar in mind for Olympus and Sony, but it's not a quick job and depends on how the camera maker stores information. And you can never quite replicate the out-of-camera JPEG (assuming that's a good thing anyway) no more than one raw converter can ever reproduce the results of another.

John

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 11, 2017

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Thanks Just Shoot Me for the editor links.  

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Jul 11, 2017 0
New Here ,
Nov 05, 2020

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I know this is an old thread, but in case anyone comes across it looking for the profile editor, here is a link:

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/digital-negative.html#downloads

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Nov 05, 2020 2