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How to Match Raw setting to Jpeg

Community Beginner ,
May 04, 2020

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I am finding that when I edit my raws in LR they are coming out soft and unshape compared to the camera jpegs. Is there a way I can match the jpeg settings to the raws so a least I have a base level to start with?

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Feature request, How to, Performance, Presets or profiles

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How to Match Raw setting to Jpeg

Community Beginner ,
May 04, 2020

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I am finding that when I edit my raws in LR they are coming out soft and unshape compared to the camera jpegs. Is there a way I can match the jpeg settings to the raws so a least I have a base level to start with?

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Feature request, How to, Performance, Presets or profiles

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882

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May 04, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 05, 2020

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The first step would be to apply a Camera Matching Profile to your raws.

https://www.lightroomqueen.com/camera-profiles/

Then if you are frequently making the same Develop adjustments (sharpening, etc) you could make a Preset with these adjustments and set this as the Default to apply to Imports. https://community.adobe.com/t5/lightroom-classic/lightroom-classic-set-defaults-for-raw-file-import/...

[Shoot only raw- then you will not have the dilemna, or is that 'dilemma'.  🙂  ]

 

 

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 10.0, Photoshop 22.0.1, Lightroom 4.0, Windows-10 Nikon DSLR.

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May 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 05, 2020

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Can you post a cropped screen shot relevant to your issue?

Are you using Import or Develop preset we can't see in your post?

Are you experienceing a difference between Library and Develop modules?

Also your OS and LR versions will help in some instances .  .  .  thanks

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May 05, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
May 05, 2020

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I have two photo here. They have both been resampled for the internet. Any way, One is the best I could do with LR while the other is in camera shapening.

Taken with LR 5.0 and Win 7 three years ago

I am having trouble recreating the sharpening and nice skin tones.

 

 

 

Lightroom.jpg

 

In Camera.JPG

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May 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 07, 2020

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In your posted photos, which is processed in Lightroom?

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May 07, 2020 1
LEGEND ,
May 07, 2020

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"I am finding that when I edit my raws in LR they are coming out soft and unshape compared to the camera jpegs. Is there a way I can match the jpeg settings to the raws so a least I have a base level to start with?"

 

In general, there is no way to exactly have the RAWs match the JPGs. If you really want that JPG look, use the JPG. If you want the flexibility to perform your own adjustments and perhaps come to a different appearance, and perhaps even a more pleasing appearance than the JPG, then you are better off with RAW.


Now it is true that with a certain amount of tweaking of the RAW image, you can come pretty close to what the JPG looks like. But that tweaking is likely to be different for each RAW image, making the whole idea of matching the JPG appearance over a lot of photos to be very time consuming and tedious. And of course, this tweaking to match the JPG misses the possibility of improving upon the JPG appearance.

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May 07, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
May 08, 2020

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The first one is LR. If you zoom in on the Eye you can see the difference.

In general, there is no way to exactly have the RAWs match the JPGs. If you really want that JPG look, use the JPG. If you want the flexibility to perform your own adjustments and perhaps come to a different appearance, and perhaps even a more pleasing appearance than the JPG, then you are better off with RAW.


Now it is true that with a certain amount of tweaking of the RAW image, you can come pretty close to what the JPG looks like. But that tweaking is likely to be different for each RAW image, making the whole idea of matching the JPG appearance over a lot of photos to be very time consuming and tedious. And of course, this tweaking to match the JPG misses the possibility of improving upon the JPG appearance.

 

Then my question is how to properly sharpen in LR to match or improve the photo in camera sharpening?

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May 08, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 09, 2020

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There are three types of sharpening.
 
Input sharpening -- Fix the softening done by the lens and camera filters. It is done in the Details panel. Amount at 100 or so, mask at 70-80. The mask is important so that you are trying to sharpen only the edges of objects.
 
Artistic sharpening -- Sharpens the important parts of the picture. Like the eyes in a portrait. This is done with an adjustment brush.
 
Output sharpening -- preps the edited image for the final output usage (printing needs much more sharpening than screen viewing). This is done in the Export dialog.
 

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May 09, 2020 0