Is it possible to have a graduated filter that is both Luminance Range Masked and Color RangeMasked?

LEGEND ,
Oct 03, 2020

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Suppose I want a graduated filter that affects only the light blue, but not the green or red of a similar lightness?

 

Is this possible, even if it involves multiple filters or other "trickery"?

 

Also, please note, that for this purpose, I can't use the erase brush to get rid of the light green or light red, its too complicated a scene.

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Adobe Community Professional , Oct 03, 2020
WobertC Adobe Community Professional , Oct 03, 2020
The 'Color' Range mask does what you ask. By placing a 'pin' on light tones of a color with the dropper tool- you select only those luminance tones. My example in screen-clips: 1) The original image   2) A Gradient applied over the whole image, with the overlay showing as 'Red'. The first dropper pin is on the lightest tones of 'Blue':   3) A second dropper pin is applied to the darkest blues at the top of the image. Note the Mid-tone blues are not fully masked!   4) A third dropper pin is ap...

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LEGEND ,
Oct 03, 2020

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Turn on the range mask, select color mask, use the tool to select blue.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2020

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The 'Color' Range mask does what you ask.

By placing a 'pin' on light tones of a color with the dropper tool- you select only those luminance tones.

My example in screen-clips:

1) The original image

ScreenShot084.jpg

 

2) A Gradient applied over the whole image, with the overlay showing as 'Red'.

The first dropper pin is on the lightest tones of 'Blue':

ScreenShot081.jpg

 

3) A second dropper pin is applied to the darkest blues at the top of the image. Note the Mid-tone blues are not fully masked!

ScreenShot082.jpg

 

4) A third dropper pin is applied to the mid-tone blues. Now ALL the blue sky is effectively selected (with the red overlay).

ScreenShot083.jpg  And -4stops exposure results as  ScreenShot086.jpg

 

Adjusting the 'Amount' slider to the lowest minimum indicates better how the three pins are selecting different luminance tones of the BLUE color-

ScreenShot085.jpg 

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 10.1.1, Photoshop 22.2, Lightroom 4.1, Windows-10 Nikon DSLR.

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