Highlighted

Lightroom Classic + Ps causing huge battery drain.

New Here ,
Aug 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm also having the same problem. My battery drained in less than 2 hours whilst using lightroom. Photoshoop and Chrome are running on the background. It's a BRAND NEW macbook pro (2020) with 32GB ram and Catalina OS. I have desabled the battery health. Is this an Apple or Adobe issue??

 

[Branched from older thread and title changed by Moderator]

Topics

How to, Mac, Problem or error

Views

35

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Lightroom Classic + Ps causing huge battery drain.

New Here ,
Aug 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm also having the same problem. My battery drained in less than 2 hours whilst using lightroom. Photoshoop and Chrome are running on the background. It's a BRAND NEW macbook pro (2020) with 32GB ram and Catalina OS. I have desabled the battery health. Is this an Apple or Adobe issue??

 

[Branched from older thread and title changed by Moderator]

Topics

How to, Mac, Problem or error

Views

36

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Aug 22, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 22, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Probably both.

 

Try shutting down both Ps and Chrome while using LrC for a while and see if that makes any difference.

 

What are you doing in LrC when this happens? Importing, Editing (using the Adjustments Brush?)?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 22, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 23, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Not sure of the exact cause, but here are some thoughts. 

 

  • If the Mac is so new that it’s only a day or two old, macOS may still be doing background setup routines such as building the initial Spotlight search index of everything on the computer. Those first-time setup routines use CPU in the background in addition to whatever you are doing in the foreground, and that temporarily reduces battery life. 
  • If you are using a 16-inch MacBook Pro, it has both integrated and discrete graphics. Discrete graphics is great for performance, but battery life is always lower when the MacBook Pro automatically switches to discrete graphics. And Lightroom Classic, Photoshop, and Chrome have one thing in common: They all make discrete graphics turn on, because they all take advantage of it. If you want Chrome to save battery by avoiding discrete graphics, you can go into its Advaned > System preferences and disable hardware graphics acceleration. 
  • A MacBook Pro is rated for around 10 hours battery, but that’s based on what Apple calls a “wireless web” test with the display at 50% brightness. If you run applications that hit the CPU and graphics a lot harder than the Safari web browser does, and if your display is brighter than 50%, you should expect far less battery life than 10 hours. 

 

I do think 2 hours seems a little too low. But again, that depends on what was going on. For example, if you just installed a bunch of applications (that tends to use a lot of CPU), and you just poured several hundred images into Lightroom Classic with preview generation turned on so that it will employ all CPU cores to build previews for every image, than sure, I would expect 2 hours of battery life because the laptop has been asked to do a series of energy-intensive tasks.

 

But once initial setup tasks have completed and you settle into a more normal daily routine, you might expect to get more like 4-7 hours of battery life when you run applications that use the CPU and graphics heavily. When just doing email/web, you may get 10 hours or more because they will not stress the CPU or graphics very much.

 

If you really want to know what is eating your battery, open Activity Monitor (in your Utilities folder) and look at the Energy tab. Check the Energy Impact and 12 Hr Power columns to find out who the top energy consumers are. In a few days, see if things have settled down and check the Energy tab again to find out the more typical energy usage of your applications.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 23, 2020 0
Jao_vdL LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 23, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Chrome is a well known battery hog on all platforms. They coded mostly for speed and ignored energy efficiency completely. So definitely try it without. That csaid, 2 hours is not strange depending on what you are doing. If you are doing lots of editing with brushes and such and generatong previews in the background, you'll hear the fan going nuts and draining your battery quickly. This is just the reality of doing very compute intensive tasks. To check open up activity monitor as conrad advises and select all processes and sort for CPU usage. Which process(es) are taking up the bulk of the CPU?

It's also possiblee for sure the machine is still indexing indeed. You can see that in activity monitor if you have a bunch od md worker processes up high in CPU. That will stop after a while.

 

Don't disable the battery health option. It will not help for this. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 23, 2020 0