Luminosity Curve in Lightroom

Explorer ,
Apr 08, 2021 Apr 08, 2021

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Hi,
When I want change my picture in Lr with tone curve, its affect the luminosity and saturation. In PS that's done easily by changing the blending mode of curve layer to Luminosity. Can we have such result in LR too? Change the luminosity in Tone curve without affecting the saturation.

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Community Professional , Apr 08, 2021 Apr 08, 2021
No, Lightroom does not support blend modes, so curves work as they do in normal mode in Photoshop.  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 08, 2021 Apr 08, 2021

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No, Lightroom does not support blend modes, so curves work as they do in normal mode in Photoshop.

 

-- Johan W. Elzenga

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Explorer ,
Apr 08, 2021 Apr 08, 2021

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I know about it. But I hoped that there are any options to solve this problem in Lr

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 09, 2021 Apr 09, 2021

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This forum is not monitored by Adobe Dev team. Therefore, feature requests and bug reports are best submitted to https://feedback.photoshop.com/topics/lightroom-classic/5f5f2093785c1f1e6cc40872 

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Mentor ,
Apr 09, 2021 Apr 09, 2021

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Tone Curve in Lightroom Classic is the tool to use for manipulating RGB values "simply".

 

If you want to separately control hue and luminosity: that is what the other adjustments are great for: Basic panel global adjustments, and local adjustments.

 

One reason why Tone Curve cannot be the primary go-to tool for manipulating tonality in LrC, is that it only operates onto the dynamic results from what the other adjustments are doing. That is all it has got to work with; analogy: as if a Raw conversion has been committed into RGB and then passed to PS, and you are now using a Curves adjustment within PS.

 

So if your current Raw conversion / processing settings have left in some "blown" highlights, or nasty blocked-up shadows (and those aren't showing because of added contrast due to Tone Curve), then you cannot now recover that lost highlight or shadow detail by means of Tone Curve. Tone Curve effectively has no access to the full original capture. It's the other adjustments that would need to be altered to do so; they do have such access. In that PS adjustment layer analogy, such problems would need to be addressed by making another, differently adjusted conversion from Raw.

 

So the best role for Tone Curve in LrC then IMO becomes quite specialist, and secondary.

 

For example, it might be used to rapidly play around with some common tonal / hue-shift "aesthetic look" - that is to be overlaid as a separable effect (similar to adding another adjustment layer in PS) over the top of potentially a whole bunch of photos. But independent of, and not disturbing or constraining, the Basic panel / Local adjustments that are already (or can be further) individualised to suit each image's own distinct exposure and content.

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Explorer ,
Apr 09, 2021 Apr 09, 2021

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— Each author has their own approaches.
— With the basic panel adjustments the same problem. When using sliders White and Black and other they are also affect the color and saturation. Only exposure slider but this section doesn't resolve the main purpose. Comfortable working with luminosity.

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Mentor ,
Apr 09, 2021 Apr 09, 2021

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Our impression of the "strength" or "depth" of any colour must surely change as its tone value is adjusted, OR as its saturation is adjusted, OR as its hue is shifted - and vice versa - that all seems to me to be an inherent attribute of vision.

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