Paper whiteness simulation usnig the softproofing function

New Here ,
Nov 25, 2020 Nov 25, 2020

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I try to improve myself in printing techniques and I have some unanswered questions about softproofing and paper whiteness simulation.

The paper and ink simulation option is supposed to reproduce, among other things, the whiteness of the paper.
But for which screen calibration (Tc K) and which color space (Melissa at 5000K and Adobe RGB and sRGB at 6500K)?

In addition, I understand that the white point of the screen must be adapted to the whiteness of the paper.
But in this case, is there not redundancy with the paper simulation of the softproofing?

Finally, I have found that this paper simulation during Lightroom proofing gives me good results if I also adapt the white point of the screen, for example, 5300K for the Epson Traditional and 5800K for the Permajet MattPlus .
Why is screen proofing with paper simulation not enough?

Could you help me understand?

 

Note: I work on an Eizo CS2420 at 90 cd / m2 (with several Tc profiles) with 70 lux illumination on my worktop at 5500K. My printer is an Epson SC P600 (used with "generic" ICC from paper manufacturers)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020 Nov 25, 2020

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You don't do this with softproof. You do it with calibration. That's much more precise, and all you need is a pair of good eyes.

 

Set the monitor white point to be a visual match to paper white (in your preferred print viewing light). It may take a little trial and error, but once there, it saves you a lot of time and guesswork later. When you "see" paper white on screen, that's it.

 

Nevermind the numbers. Just get a visual match.

 

I assume you're using Colornavigator, which makes this extremely simple and convenient. You can store as many calibration targets as you like, and switch between them with a click. Just remember to relaunch Lightroom when you do, it needs to load the corresponding monitor profile.

 

I strongly advise you to do the same for the black point. The black level has a huge impact on the perceived "punch" of the image, and is the prime source for the misunderstanding that "you can't match print and screen". You can, but the black level is the single most important aspect to match.

 

Softproof is only for checking gamut clipping.

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New Here ,
Nov 25, 2020 Nov 25, 2020

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Thanks for your answer.

I understand that you do not use the paper & ink simulation option of soft
proofing, but only calibration:

- White point adjusted according the paper whiteness
- Black point adjusted according paper Dmax (max paper contrast)

That's fine, but requires frequent re-calibrations when changing paper type
(I have only 4 free settings available with Color Navigator).

I am trying to understand how the paper simulation option works and whether
we can (have to?) combine both to get better soft proofing.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020 Nov 25, 2020

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Yes, you want to soft proof with paper and ink simulation for the closest visual match between display and screen. 

Soft proofing in Adobe Photoshop CC

 

In this 33 minute video, I'll cover soft proofing in Adobe Photoshop CC:

What is sof proofing.

Setting up a soft proof. 

Saving soft proof presets.

What the simluate ink and paper check boxes do, why to use them.

Making output specific edits in layer sets.

Working with soft proofing in full screen mode.

The Out of Gamut Overlay and why to ignore it. 

 

High resolution: http://digitaldog.net/files/SoftProofingInPhotoshopCC.mp4

Low resolution (YouTube): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njFgYba3lHU&feature=youtu.be

Additionally: 

http://digitaldog.net/files/LR4_softproof.mov

http://digitaldog.net/files/LR4_softproof2.mov

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management" (pluralsight.com)
In this 33 minute video, I'll cover soft proofing in Adobe Photoshop CC:What is soft proofing.Setting up a soft proof. Saving soft proof presets.What the sim...

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New Here ,
Nov 27, 2020 Nov 27, 2020

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Hi Andrew,

I visited your site, which is very interesting ; I learnt a lot in your
very clear videos (not yet watched all of them...).
I am still struggling with the screen white point to be used for the best
soft proofing and why.
I understand the soft proofing rendering table in the ICC profile is made
for D50 illuminant.
Does it mean that it works only for a white point at 5000K?
That's not what I experienced and what we can read in reference Web sites
(between 5000 and 6500) or books (Jeff Schewe is advising 6500K!).

I am sorry to insist, but my engineering background makes me go deeper and
deeper...

Thanks a lot for all the valuable information you already gave to me.

Best regards,
Philippe (phfsly)

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