Highlighted

What does monitors icc profile do in jpeg export options?

New Here ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi guys,

I have run in some problems with exporting my raw pictures as jpeg.

If I export them I have several options about color profiles.

I understand that if I export it in srgb or adobeRGB it will convert it to this color space.

But what will it do if I choose the color profile of my monitor?

Any hints?

 

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by johnrellis | Most Valuable Participant

"I understand that if I export it in srgb or adobeRGB it will convert it to this color space.

But what will it do if I choose the color profile of my monitor?"

 

Not sure why you want to do this. But...

 

It will convert the exported photo to the color space represented by the display profile and it will embed the display profile in the photo.  That means if you view the photo on that display with a color-managed program and with a non-color-managed program (one that sends the raw color numbers in the photo to the display), you should see the same colors. And if you view the photo on some other calibrated display, you should see the same colors.

 

But note that converting the photo to the display's profile could shrink the gamut of colors in the photo to that of the display.  For example, if the display is a traditional narrow-gamut display that approximates sRGB, then the photo will be restricted to those sRGB colors only, and colors outside sRGB's gamut will be mapped to the nearest colors in sRGB.  

 

[Use the blue reply button under the first post to ensure replies sort properly.]

Topics

How to, Problem or error, Windows

Views

75

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

What does monitors icc profile do in jpeg export options?

New Here ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi guys,

I have run in some problems with exporting my raw pictures as jpeg.

If I export them I have several options about color profiles.

I understand that if I export it in srgb or adobeRGB it will convert it to this color space.

But what will it do if I choose the color profile of my monitor?

Any hints?

 

Most Valuable Participant
Correct answer by johnrellis | Most Valuable Participant

"I understand that if I export it in srgb or adobeRGB it will convert it to this color space.

But what will it do if I choose the color profile of my monitor?"

 

Not sure why you want to do this. But...

 

It will convert the exported photo to the color space represented by the display profile and it will embed the display profile in the photo.  That means if you view the photo on that display with a color-managed program and with a non-color-managed program (one that sends the raw color numbers in the photo to the display), you should see the same colors. And if you view the photo on some other calibrated display, you should see the same colors.

 

But note that converting the photo to the display's profile could shrink the gamut of colors in the photo to that of the display.  For example, if the display is a traditional narrow-gamut display that approximates sRGB, then the photo will be restricted to those sRGB colors only, and colors outside sRGB's gamut will be mapped to the nearest colors in sRGB.  

 

[Use the blue reply button under the first post to ensure replies sort properly.]

Topics

How to, Problem or error, Windows

Views

76

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
LEGEND ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Those are for soft proofing. A concept that I am poor at.

 

hmmm, may be off, need to off my rear end and use my PC to look at that.

 

 

 

Just another Adobe customer; My Sys; APP: LRC 9.4, PS 21.2.1; CMP: WIN WS 16GB OS 10 v1909 (18363), mid 2015 MBPr 15” 16GB MACOS 10.15.6; 4K EXT DSPY; CAM: Canon 5D Mk III, Fuji X-T3

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You probably want to soft proof and export using the sRGB color space. This is especially true if you are going to share your images with others, send your images to a lab to be printed or share them on the web. I would think the only time you would want to soft proof with your own monitor profile would be if you are only planning to look at the images on your own monitor.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Most Valuable Participant ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"I understand that if I export it in srgb or adobeRGB it will convert it to this color space.

But what will it do if I choose the color profile of my monitor?"

 

Not sure why you want to do this. But...

 

It will convert the exported photo to the color space represented by the display profile and it will embed the display profile in the photo.  That means if you view the photo on that display with a color-managed program and with a non-color-managed program (one that sends the raw color numbers in the photo to the display), you should see the same colors. And if you view the photo on some other calibrated display, you should see the same colors.

 

But note that converting the photo to the display's profile could shrink the gamut of colors in the photo to that of the display.  For example, if the display is a traditional narrow-gamut display that approximates sRGB, then the photo will be restricted to those sRGB colors only, and colors outside sRGB's gamut will be mapped to the nearest colors in sRGB.  

 

[Use the blue reply button under the first post to ensure replies sort properly.]

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Most Valuable Participant ,
Apr 14, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"I would think the only time you would want to soft proof with your own monitor profile would be if you are only planning to look at the images on your own monitor."

 

Is there any point to soft-proofing with the display profile?  That would be the same as simply viewing the photo in Loupe view with no soft-proofing enabled.

 

[Use the blue reply button under the first post to ensure replies sort properly.]

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
JimHess LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I guess that's basically what I was trying to say.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...