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Why Does Print Module Export Increase File Size and 'Stroke' Borders

New Here ,
May 06, 2020

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Help!! Im so confused . . . Does anybody have an explanation as to why when exporting from the Print module in Lightroom Classic, at 300dpi the file size has increased from 5.4 MB to 8.4 MB having added a white 'stroke' border?

Exporting not via the print module keeps it at 5.4 MB. Can't figure out why, what appears to be the same specificaitons gets two very different results?

Also, how big is 20 pts on the 'stroke' border in mm? Internet gives me so many different answers and is there a way to increase this so I know its 10mm?

A confused non-expert lightroom user!!

 

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FAQ, How to, Import and export

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Why Does Print Module Export Increase File Size and 'Stroke' Borders

New Here ,
May 06, 2020

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Help!! Im so confused . . . Does anybody have an explanation as to why when exporting from the Print module in Lightroom Classic, at 300dpi the file size has increased from 5.4 MB to 8.4 MB having added a white 'stroke' border?

Exporting not via the print module keeps it at 5.4 MB. Can't figure out why, what appears to be the same specificaitons gets two very different results?

Also, how big is 20 pts on the 'stroke' border in mm? Internet gives me so many different answers and is there a way to increase this so I know its 10mm?

A confused non-expert lightroom user!!

 

TOPICS
FAQ, How to, Import and export

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2.0K

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May 06, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2020

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A digital file does not have any dimension in millimeters, so you can't really talk about a 10 mm wide border in a digital file. The resolution in ppi (not dpi) is only relevant when the file is printed. So if you would want to have a 10 mm wide border when printed, then the math would be as follows: Your print will be 300 pixels per inch. An inch is 25.4 mm. So in order to get a 10 mm wide border, that border needs to be 300/25.4*10=118 pixels wide. 

 

You can't compare the file sizes just like that. When you export your image via the export menu, you will export it at the original size (unless you resize it in the export dialog). When you print to file, you will print a file that has the dimensions of the chosen paper size, multiplied by the resolution in pixels per inch that you chose in the Print module. That could give quite a different size image. It could be smaller than the original, but it could also be bigger.

-- Johan W. Elzenga, http://www.johanfoto.com

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May 06, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 14, 2020

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Thank you Johan - this was very helpful!

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May 14, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 06, 2020

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Hi Karen,

 

Not seeing the original dimensions of your project it's hard to be exact but probably the issue is one of resolution. Piece of trivia, if you double the width of an image, it's storage size quadruples. So, for example, if you have an image that is 2000 pixels wide and 1500 pixels tall, it's a 3,000,000 pixel image. If you now double that (4000 x 3000), it's a 12,000,000 pixel image. The issue here is that each pixel adds to the storage size of an image.

 

So, if creating that white border added to the total size of the image (by adding pixels around the original image), that's probably where the extra storage size came from. 

 

As far as the font issue, whew, welcome to fonts. Technically, fonts are measured in points and each point is 1/72 of an inch. But in real life what does that mean? In the font world, the size is based on an invisible box which encompasses the tallest ascender to the lowest decender (notice that width doesn't enter into the conversation). 

 

Try this experiment: Take the fonts in question and make a test sample of the text you wish to use. Write it out multiple times (one for each font) and then print that out. E.g.,

Mary had a little lamb

Mary had a little lamb

Mary had a little lamb

 

But each line should be a different font BUT ALL OF THE SAME SIZE.

 

You will see that each one is a different width even though they are all (sic) 12 point.

 

So, to answer your question, you will have to experiment to find your answer with your own fonts. 

 

Last piece of trivia: When the Mac was first introduced, it had one extra piece of uniqueness: each pixel on the screen was 1/72" so that when you were using text, it truly was WYSIWYG. Something that was 72 pixels tall was in real life 1" (and would print on your Imagewriter that way. That is significantly why, to this day, you will see references to screen resolution as 1/72" even though that has nothing to do with (for example) my screen which is a 5k iMac.

 

Let us know if this helps you out.

 

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May 06, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 14, 2020

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Thanks Gary - so helpful!

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May 14, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 07, 2020

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The file size should be very close to the same using the Print module and Export module using. JPEG compression of the added stroke border should not increase the file size significantly. Check your size, resolution, quality, and sharping settings in both modules to make sure they are identical.

 

You can use an online converter to calculate the stroke border size in pts. 20 pts = 7.06 mm. A 10mm stroke is 28.35 pts, which is not possible in the LR Print module since its limited to 20 pts.

https://www.unitconverters.net/length/point-to-millimeter.htm

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May 07, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 14, 2020

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Thanks Todd - I'll try that out. Much appreciated!

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May 14, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 14, 2020

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You can create a 10mm white border using the Margins settings as in the below example. To keep the border uniform you will need to check 'Zoom to Fill' which may crop a small amount of the image area dependent on the actual image aspect ratio and target paper size. Leave it unchecked if a non-uniform border is acceptable. You also need to set the Print Sharpening for the target paper type (Glossy or Matte). The below example uses a standard uncropped camera image with a 2x3 aspect ratio and target paper size of 203mm x 305 mm (8" x 12"). A very small amount of the image top and bottom is cropped. You can reposition the image crop by placing the curso over it and holding down the left mouse key.

 

10mm border print.jpg

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May 14, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 14, 2020

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Hi Todd - I'm hitting another issue which is preventing me getting my exact required print size.

 

Under 'Develop' I have scaled the image to 210 x 297.

In the Print Module/ Page Setup I've got a custom size set - borderless, 210 x 297mm (or A4 in UK).

 

Screenshot 2020-05-14 at 21.57.37.png

I've got no margins under the Layout Panel and the cell size is also 210 x 297mm.

Screenshot 2020-05-14 at 22.15.23.png

However, when you look at the dimension 'label' on the image itself, it is fractionally off at 209.99 (there is a tiny white edge showing on the right - see image below) The 'zoom to fill' adjusts the height by a fraction to the right size but does nothing to the width and I can't figure out why!

 

Screenshot 2020-05-14 at 22.02.32.png

 

There is also a white edge along the bottom of the image that disappears when I 'hide' the rulers. So I guess that's just some type of shadow and not actually margin?

 

The output of the photo with or without the white margin (top tip by the way) is fractionally off due to the above issues and I need it exact.

Any ideas? Thanks so much!

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May 14, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 14, 2020

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In your original post you were using the Print module to output a JPEG file, which would then be used by an outside printing facility. What you are doing now is printing direct to a local attached printer. What model printer are you using?

 

Also what exactly do you mean by "Under 'Develop' I have scaled the image to 210 x 297?" Please explain in detail how you are accomplishing this "scaling" and what the image size is in pixels after doing so.

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May 14, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 21, 2020

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Hi - sorry for the late response.

 

Ignore my comments about resizing under the Develop menu before printing. I think I'm making it more confusing than it is.

 

So I have my original image and want to print to file at A4  or  210 x 297 mm. Below are my print options.

 

PRINT OPTIONS - NO MARGINPRINT OPTIONS - NO MARGINPRINT OPTION 2 - PRINT TO FILEPRINT OPTION 2 - PRINT TO FILE

 

The output for an A4 should be 2480 x 3508 px and mine comes out at 2480 x 3507 px!

And as my picture below shows, in lightroom there is a tiny edge of 'white' on the right that simply won't go! Also corroborated by the image size, which is 209.99 instead of 210.

 

I hope that makes sense and hope you can help once more! It's driving me crazy! 🙂

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May 21, 2020 0
New Here ,
May 21, 2020

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Screenshot 2020-05-22 at 06.55.32.png

 

Forgot to include this pic!

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May 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 23, 2020

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That looks like a rounding error in a mm to inches conversion. 297 mm is 11.69 inches rounded to two significant digits. 11.69*300=3507 pixels. If you do the mm to inches conversion with one more significant digit, you get 11.693*300 = 3507.9, which rounds to 3508. So that is likely the issue here. I would simply specify the custom file dimensions output size exactly in pixels instead of millimeters if you want exactly 3508 pixels.

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May 23, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 23, 2020

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Jao, pixels isn't a Layout Unit option in the Print module. Since the error is only 1 pixel this will never be visible in a print or onscreen so of no concern. I have no idea why her print preview shows a white edge as shown in her screenshot. I don't see it using her settings so have suggested she reset LR Preferences. Using her settings do you see the white edge and 209.99 x 297 mm paper size in the image preview?

Screenshot 2020-05-22 at 06.55.32.png

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May 23, 2020 0