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How do I control the exposure of the sun?

New Here ,
Oct 23, 2022 Oct 23, 2022

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Folks, I’m a relative newbie to Lightroom 12.0.  I shot the attached sunset as a learning exercise.  Nikon D7500, 80 mm, 1/125 sec., f/4.0, ISO 280. Exported edited RAW file as a JPG - see: attached.  How do I tone down the sun while preserving its color (more or less) without affecting the rest of the image?  I tried setting up a radial gradient mask over the sun and then played around with exposure, temperature, tint, and hue. I couldn’t affect any significant change. Reducing exposure just makes the sun display as a gray circle. Feathering = 0; so Amount defaults to 100.  Help please.  Thanks.  Vic. 

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Oct 23, 2022 Oct 23, 2022

This is an 'in camera' problem where, if possible, reduce camera exposure sufficient to render some color in the sun if it is filtered through the atmosphere. This would result in the rest of the scene being very under-exposed. Perhaps a situation for HDR technique.

 

When the image tones have been "clipped" to pure white (by the extreme brightness) as in your image, then nothing will bring back color or detail in the sun. As you found the 'white' sun will just go 'grey'.

In Photoshop you may be

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Community Expert ,
Oct 23, 2022 Oct 23, 2022

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This is an 'in camera' problem where, if possible, reduce camera exposure sufficient to render some color in the sun if it is filtered through the atmosphere. This would result in the rest of the scene being very under-exposed. Perhaps a situation for HDR technique.

 

When the image tones have been "clipped" to pure white (by the extreme brightness) as in your image, then nothing will bring back color or detail in the sun. As you found the 'white' sun will just go 'grey'.

In Photoshop you may be able to layer another suitable sun image on your scene.

 

 

Regards. My System: Lr-Classic 12.0.1 Photoshop 24.0.1, ACR 15.0, Lightroom 6.0, Lr-iOS 8.0.8, Bridge 13.0, Windows-11.

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