P: Half-transparent gap/line added on the bottom of an image when resizing

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Community Beginner ,
May 16, 2022 May 16, 2022

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캡처.PNG

sorry in advance for the poor quality image.

When I resize an image with the black-colored pixels on the bottom, it creates a half-transparent, gray-colored line. It doesn't matter if I make the image bigger or smaller, it makes that empty gap. It's a glitch that has been there since photoshop CC 2017. 
People I know have been manually filling the gap or covering it. Has anyone experienced a similar issue?

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Adobe Employee , May 17, 2022 May 17, 2022

I don't think this is a new behavior. It's a subpixel of interpolation from the transparent pixels off the edges of the floating layer. A background layer won't have this behavior.

 

CS6: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/92567b9b-b982-4758-4022-f89d03e8655c

CC 2015.5: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/b4e99102-e9c2-4ea5-6bef-5632ce41aeb1

CC 2022: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/b5c4ae1a-7545-4ba2-4032-6aa710054f62

 

I'll see if this is something we can improve in the future.

 

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Explorer ,
Jun 06, 2019 Jun 06, 2019

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When I resize a photo, Photoshop is putting a single-pixel semi-transparent border around the entire resized image. In the original image the color goes all the way to the edge of the image and there are no transparent pixels anywhere in the image to begin with. See the enlarged screen capture below, the red arrows point to the top and left border added by Photoshop after sizing it down.

Screen Shot 2019-05-31 at 3.44.19 PM.jpg

PLEASE FIX THIS, it's a really annoying bug, thanks.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 06, 2019 Jun 06, 2019

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Hi

We do not work for Adobe, we are just Photoshop users here.

You can report bugs at the link below where they will be seen by developers.https://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family

Photoshop Family Customer Community

although it has been reported previously : Photoshop: Why does resizing a document without a background layer causes transparent pixels on edge...

In the meantime you can work around the issue by adding a background layer (locked). Add a new layer , use Shift +Ctrl+Alt+E to merge a copy of all visible onto it. Move it to the bottom of your layerstack and use Layer > New Background from Layer. Then resize.

Dave

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Community Beginner ,
Sep 15, 2019 Sep 15, 2019

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Thanks a lot. This worked for me!

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Community Beginner ,
May 01, 2020 May 01, 2020

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I am using Photoshop 2020 and just came across this bug. I've seen arguments that it's only doing the correct thing as there are no pixels ouside the image and so interpolating the edge pixels can't work properly, but thats a feeble answer from someone who is a developer (PS I am a dev myself). The common sense approach is that this should not happen and is what most people expect and so I would class this as a bug. However, I have found a much simpler solution than the convoluted solution above. Just duplicating the layer and then resizing seems to work. PS My issue was with a single PNG image opened in Photoshop and therefore I only have one layer to start with,

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 01, 2020 May 01, 2020

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"It's not a bug, it's a feature". This is part of the broader issue of how Photoshop resizes rectangles. I first came across it back around v7.0. With all due respect to Mr.Cox, it should not be like this. There are two common work-arounds, neither of which are satisfactory.

 

You can resize using Nearest Neighbor, which looks dreadful. Or, after resizing with some other interpolation, select the edge pixels, and Image > Apply Image, using multiply. This lessens the problem, but doesn't make it go away.

 

Photoshop used to ship with a tool called Filter Factory, which allowed you to directly control the transparency of individual pixels. There was an updated clone of this from a site called Telegraphics, Filter Foundry, which is only available for 32-bit, and the developer has no plans to update it to 64-bit. I keep a 32-bit copy of CC 2018 just to run this.

 

It should be easy to deal with this, but I haven't found any for 64-bit.

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New Here ,
May 24, 2020 May 24, 2020

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I solved this by duplicating the image as a new layer, then resizing and saving.

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New Here ,
Aug 10, 2020 Aug 10, 2020

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Come on.. This is just [removed by moderator] right.. Paying much for this software and this bug is still there..
If it's not a bug, please add an option to disable this..

 

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New Here ,
Sep 07, 2020 Sep 07, 2020

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Agreed. This is obviously a bug. Okay, so it happens for a reason, and maths dictates that it will happen. Fine. I get that, I accept that. But you simply find a workaround so that the user sees what they are expecting to see. When I resize something, I am not expecting a 1px transparent bit at the top and bottom that wasn't there before. You put yourself in the user's position and design your software for them. Quite frankly, ADOBE products are not cheap. So yes, this is [removed by moderator].

 

The duplicate layer workaround works simply because it puts pixels from the original image below the transparent part, but the problem hasn't gone away. Considering that this bug was first addressed nearly 6 years ago, it is pretty pathetic that this problem still exists.

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Adobe Employee ,
May 17, 2022 May 17, 2022

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I don't think this is a new behavior. It's a subpixel of interpolation from the transparent pixels off the edges of the floating layer. A background layer won't have this behavior.

 

CS6: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/92567b9b-b982-4758-4022-f89d03e8655c

CC 2015.5: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/b4e99102-e9c2-4ea5-6bef-5632ce41aeb1

CC 2022: https://shared-assets.adobe.com/link/b5c4ae1a-7545-4ba2-4032-6aa710054f62

 

I'll see if this is something we can improve in the future.

 


Senior Product Manager - Customer Advocacy - Digital Imaging

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