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1

Dark Horizontal banding lines in photo

New Here ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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Hi everyone, 

I recently shot some photos on a dim lit balcony with electronic shutter on and I have noticed some dissapointing results on some images. 

 

I have researched just about everything I can think of in an attempt to remove these horrible lines. However, I have come up empty handed. 

 

Does anyone here have a realistic approach to removing the lines out of this photo? 

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iPadOS , macOS , Web , Windows

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Guide ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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What was the light source? What was your shutter speed? If some kind of LED lighting, those bars are caused by the cycling of the LEDS brightness with the frequency of the power supply.

 

Ken Seals - Nikon Z 9, Z 8, 14mm-800mm. Computer Win 11 Pro, I7-8700K, 64GB, RTX3070TI. Travel machine: 2021 MacBook Pro M1 MAX 64GB. All Adobe apps.

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New Here ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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1/320 shutter speed. 

And there were LED lights everywhere unfortunately. 

 

 

 

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Guide ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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If you have 50 Hz A/C power, try a shutter speed slower than 1/50 sec so the power cycle can complete and you should have even lighting. The same thing happens in the US with 60 Hz power on LEDs and fluorescent bulbs.

Sorry, I can't think of a way to remove that in processing.

 

Ken Seals - Nikon Z 9, Z 8, 14mm-800mm. Computer Win 11 Pro, I7-8700K, 64GB, RTX3070TI. Travel machine: 2021 MacBook Pro M1 MAX 64GB. All Adobe apps.

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Community Expert ,
May 05, 2024 May 05, 2024

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Yes, this is flickering LED lights and a scanning electronic shutter that reads line by line. Also known as the "rolling shutter" effect.

 

There's no easy way to fix this after the fact. It's possible if you pour extraordinary amounts of work and time into it, but unless it's an extremely important image it's probably not worth it. It's a lot of work.

 

If your camera has a mechanical shutter, use that. Mechanical curtain shutters are not affected by this. Unfortunately, some cameras don't, and then you always have to watch out for this. Test in advance to find a safe shutter speed range. My experience is that LED power supplys have a mind of their own and don't always follow the mains frequency.

 

Sony is currently developing a "global" shutter that reads the whole frame in one go, instead of scanning line by line. This is only available in a few expensive models at this time, but will probably become mainstream eventually. In the meantime, this could be a case where AI could actually be useful, instead of a silly toy...

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