Flat image issue

New Here ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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Hello.

 

I have a problem with uploading raw images into Photoshop/Lightroom for edit.

 

I am a photographer and in general I shoot with a flat profile picture, set it in my camera photo(canon eos 6dmk ii).

 

The problem is, after I shoot an image and look back for a short preview to my display camera, it looks ok like I want it to be (less contrast, less saturation, etc) but after I upload it into my laptop and get prepared to edit with Photoshop/Lightroom, it looks totall different, with increased contrast, color saturation, etc.

 

Is there any solution to solve this bug?

 

Thank you in advanced.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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The image you see on the camera is a jpg, with your camera settings applied.

The camera settings are also written to the raw files, but Lightroom and ACR don't understand these proprietary settings, and ignores them. 

You can use a camera matching profile in Lightroom Classic and ACR, if they exist for your camera.

You'll find these profiles in the profile browser, directly below the histogram in  LR develop or in ACR.

I don't know how to do this in ACR, but in Lightroom Classic, you can set up camera specific defaults in Preferences > Presets, that include the profile.

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New Here ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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The image inside my canera is not a jpg because I.m not shooting in a jpg format or jpg+raw format. I shoot only in raw.

And when I shoot in raw, I have this profile picture mentioned above so I can easely manipulated in post-process.

The only issue I.ve got is this: when I upload the image into Photoshop/Lightroom for edit, it shows the image with lot of contrast,saturation,etc.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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What you see on the camera LCD is a camera-generated jpeg with the camera settings applied. What you output to your computer is a raw file, basically a straight data dump from the sensor, pre any processing and settings applied.

 

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Community Expert ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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Canon's picture profiles are used in two places.

1. In camera to produce the image on the camera screen.

2. When developing in camera to output a jpeg.

 

They can be matched in Canon's own DPP software so that the conversion from raw to a non raw format (whichever is chosen) uses a similar conversion.

 

Adobe Camera Raw/Lightroom ignores the camera profile and starts from scratch with the raw file - which is meant to be adjusted.  Adobe provide a range of profiles as starting points for those adjustments and for some cameras (I'm not sure about the 6D) there are camera matching profiles which are designed to emulate the in camera profiles. Note that is emulate - they do not match exactly. You can also set up a profile for your camera and use that as a starting point. You can even have a group of profiles so that your starting point can vary by camera settings (for example by ISO)

 

I use a Canon 5DMkIV and do not bother with the in camera profile, the camera is on it's defaults as far as profiles are concerned. Nor do I try to match a particular Canon profile in ACR. Instead, I treat each image/set of images as I would a film negative and adjust it in Lightroom to give the best conversion for that image. If I have taken a sequence with the same camera settings, I sync the adjustments and then go through tweaking individual conversions if required.

 

Dave

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Community Expert ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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quote

I treat each image/set of images as I would a film negative and adjust it in Lightroom to give the best conversion for that image.

By @davescm

 

That's exactly what I do as well.

And you learn a lot about editing by moving sliders.

But a profile can provide you with a good starting point – I use Adobe Standard.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 21, 2022 Jul 21, 2022

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As explained, you are seeing the embedded JPEG PREVIEW which has your camera settings baked in. The RAW file, however, is treated by Lightroom/ACR as if it had no camera settings. Its working exactly as designed.

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