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How to change the "skin" of an object

New Here ,
Dec 18, 2022 Dec 18, 2022

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I have taken photos of vases I have made out of a certain type of wood and would like to simulate how each of them would look in a very different type of wood. I can take photos of the new wood flat, but is there any way to take those photos of the new wood and get them to "reskin" the exisiting vase? Again, these are not 3D files, just flat photos, so just dropping them on top does not capture the curves of the vase.

thanks

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Community Expert ,
Dec 18, 2022 Dec 18, 2022

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You must limit texture to object using selection, actually mask and perhaps to use blending modes to apply new texture to object.

In short, create selection of object then use it to create mask on layer with new texture which should be on layer above image with vase. Try using blending, opacity and/or advanced blending modes to create realistic new texture for object (vase).

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Community Expert ,
Dec 18, 2022 Dec 18, 2022

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Please post the images in question. 

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LEGEND ,
Dec 19, 2022 Dec 19, 2022

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As Mr. Pfaffenbichler said, some images would help a lot. If you don't want to use 3D, your options are extremely limited, though. Since PS has no consistent warping/ distortion toolset, fitting such stuff after the fact will always be a pain and require a lot of work.

 

Mylenium

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Community Expert ,
Dec 19, 2022 Dec 19, 2022

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Not to mention that one may have to »remove« the original grain/texture first

And how difficult that might be depends. 

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New Here ,
Dec 19, 2022 Dec 19, 2022

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Thanks for all input. I have attached two photos. In one you can see the vase shape (it is actually a pendant lamp, but I thought calling it a vase would be more clear), and in the other is a wood texture I would wrap to simulate it being made of those strips of Hickory instead of dyed Maple. I am pretty sure it can't be done in PS because it has no AI to recognize that as a 3D shape and just dropping a texture on will make it appear flat (even with blending modes). I just wanted to be sure.

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LEGEND ,
Dec 19, 2022 Dec 19, 2022

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For this particular piece it would be perfectly doable without even requiring an actual source photo. You'd simply rebuild it completely artificially with the photo merely providing a reference or a basis for the non-wooden parts. Pretty much anything in there could be faked with a bunch of  simple layers bent and squeezed into place to provide the higlights and shadows and then all you would need in your document is some path or layer mask that provides the contour which can then be cut out after the photos have been treated with a Bulge effect to create some curvature. You would need to find some better source images, though. Your parquet/ block wood image is blurry and has notable lens abberations plus overall it would likely not provide enough resolution to extract soem sections with a nice wood grain pattern.

 

Mylenium

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New Here ,
Dec 19, 2022 Dec 19, 2022

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Thanks, I sort of get it, but I don't really follow, "simple layers bent
and squeezed into place" w/o them just looking flat. I understand playing
with the bulge filter, but I don't see how that can really capture this
shape.
thanks
Dan

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