• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers
Exit
0

How to color-manage Display P3 image file

Community Beginner ,
Feb 24, 2019 Feb 24, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

When I try to open in Photoshop photos I made with my Iphone 8 Plus, I get the following message.  Which option should I choose?

"The document (document title here) has an embedded color profile that does not match the current RGB working space.

"Embedded: Display P3

Working:  sRGB IEC61966-2.1

What would you like to do?

Use the embedded profile (instead of the working space)?

Convert the document’s colors….?

Discard the embedded profile?"

Thanks.

Views

21.1K

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe
Community Expert ,
Mar 14, 2023 Mar 14, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@Tony Whitehall 1: "I'll start converting my Display P3 files to Adobe RGB for printing my giclees, to maintain the superior spectrum of Adobe RGB over sRGB so I can get even brighter colors on my giclees."

If printing to a high gamut device [inkjet/giclee] why not just keep your images in the original P3 colourspace? 

 

2: If I had a P3 file, with high saturation, and wanted to print on fabric [after first converting to sRGB to suit the print service], I'd take control of the conversion manually, so - I'd make a copy and "convert to profile", destination sRGB*

*[note that rendering intent selection is largely irrelevant here, inasmuch as you cant have perceptual - meaning that relative colorimetric and perceptual will come out the same - because the destination colourspace (sRGB) only has colorimetric tags], after conversion compare the two. OK you've lost saturation - but have you lost detail in saturated areas? 

We know that some colours in a P3 original may not be encompassed by sRGB, there's no way of maintaining that saturation [we can't fit a pint into a half pint glass] - BUT, when the conversion takes place, DETAIL may be lost in those saturated areas when they are "clipped" in the conversion. A little manual well targetted desaturation before conversion may work wonders for such detail.

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net - adobe forum volunteer - co-author: 'getting colour right'
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Mar 06, 2019 Mar 06, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks, D.

You wrote, "There is no problem working in P3, but you should never send out a file as P3, or post online or otherwise publish. Then you should convert to sRGB or Adobe RGB as required. One or more output actions could take care of that."

I just experimented with a Display P3 image; I converted a wide-spectrum P3 file to Abobe RGB.  I see no loss of spectrum in the image and no change in the image. 

Therefore, I've concluded that I should convert all of my Display P3 images to Adobe RGB for printing, (and as recommended earlier, convert for Web publishing to sRGB).  I assume that my Epson 9890 wide-format printer can print Adobe RGB files with no loss of spectrum if I use the proper media type for printing. 

(I'm printing on Epson Exhibition Canvas Matte, so I would continue to choose that media type for printing the Adobe RGB files to maintain the broad spectrum that I can see on my computer monitor.)

Tony

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Mar 14, 2023 Mar 14, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST
quote

I assume that my Epson 9890 wide-format printer can print Adobe RGB files with no loss of spectrum if I use the proper media type for printing. 

 

(I'm printing on Epson Exhibition Canvas Matte, so I would continue to choose that media type for printing the Adobe RGB files to maintain the broad spectrum that I can see on my computer monitor.)

 

You would need to set Adobe RGB (1988) as the colour, the default would be sRGB:

 

https://epson.com/Support/wa00352

 

https://files.support.epson.com/docid/cpd4/cpd43301/source/printers/source/printing_software/windows...

 

https://download4.epson.biz/sec_pubs/sc-p700_series/useg/en/GUID-7C584C70-78C3-433E-B614-56742F754A7...

 

Adobe RGB is much wider in gamut compared to a matte canvas media gamut. The gamut will either be compressed or clipped, so moderate to high saturation will not be retained.

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Mar 06, 2019 Mar 06, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Tony, the conclusion above was to not convert (both from Stephen and myself). With that kind of steady volume, it makes no sense. Just keep your files with the embedded P3 profile - don't convert to Adobe RGB.

It's very important, however, that you instantly know the color space of any file you're working on. Having it displayed in the bottom left corner is the best way to do that.

This has a bearing on further processing, and a P3 file needs different treatment from an sRGB file. There is no problem working in P3, but you should never send out a file as P3, or post online or otherwise publish. Then you should convert to sRGB or Adobe RGB as required. One or more output actions could take care of that.

DCI-P3 does not yet qualify as a standard color space. It may in the future, but not yet. Treat it accordingly.

https://forums.adobe.com/people/Tony+Whitehall  wrote

I want to continue to use my Iphone 8 Plus (which I bought in December for almost $1,000) because I found out that it's camera monitor has brighter colors than any of my other cameras, so I can get better photos with my iPhone than with any of my other cameras.

The camera monitor has no effect on the quality of the file. It may instantly look better when you check the screen, but image quality depends only on the sensor and the optics used. A phone has a tiny plastic lens, and a tiny sensor. I've yet to see a phone image even in the same league as a decent system camera. They usually work well for the intended purpose, but often fall apart with any further processing.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Nov 05, 2019 Nov 05, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Tony has a capture device that supports P3 and an editing system/monitor that supports P3. I don't see a reason for him to consider Adobe RGB for any part of this process. If I were Tony, I would keep all image masters in RGB P3 and edit in RGB P3. If the resulting image will be output to a printer, I would use Photoshop's View > Proof Setup to simulate the printer profile in CMYK while editing in RGB P3. If the result is going to the web only, then I would View > Proof Setup > sRGB. Note that you can change these virtual proof settings at any time without altering the file, and you'll be able to see how your image changes for the output formats. When he's done editing, he can make a appropriate conversion for a copy that goes to print or web (e.g., to CMYK with printer profile for print / RGB with sRGB profile for web).

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 05, 2019 Nov 05, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You've replied to an old thread. There is one statement in your response where I would disagree, that is a step to convert to CMYK for print. He is printing directly on an Epson Inkjet and the driver will expect RGB. So yes, the correct printer profile for his paper, ink and print combination is essential but the conversion into the ink set - which is wider than CMYK will happen in the print driver. No need, in fact it would be disadvantageous, to convert the document to a CMYK profile first.

 

Dave

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Nov 06, 2019 Nov 06, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yep. That makes sense.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines