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How to remember camera raw filter settings applied to a jpeg?

Participant ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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I use the filter > camera raw filter on some jpeg files to adjust color on each file and then save each as a copy.

How can I remember the settings (color temp and the tint) I use on each jpeg so I can tweak them later without starting from scratch? For example when I look at the thumbnails of all the photos I may notice some of them are bluer than the others. So I would want to tweak these photos to be less blue using previous adjustments as a starting point. I don't want to re-edit the edited jpeg files to avoid cumulative jpeg artifacts. I want to re-edit the original jpeg files with the previously used raw filter settings already fill-in.

 

What's the easiest way to do this?

 

I did not shoot raw files.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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From the ... flyout menu, make a preset.

FWIW, you are indeed reediting a JPEG using ACR as a filter or otherwise. No free lunch here. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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To avoid cumulative deterioration, you need to work with smart objects. You will still get one instance of further deterioration as that smart object is eventually rasterized, but you get away with one instead of several.

 

The ACR filter is just a filter like any other. It seems you're confusing the ACR filter with ACR raw processing.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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When you edit a jpg in ACR, it should create an XML file for the info, which should allow you to go back and edit. I think the problem is that you save as a copy, which bakes in the correction, this not only limits your ability to remember the changes you made, but is destructive to the image. @thedigitaldog knows more about this than I do

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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Yes, but that's using ACR as a full processor, opening the image there. Here, the OP is using the ACR filter from Photoshop.

 

Full ACR processing will also avoid cumulative deterioration, just one additional instance at the end.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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One can force ACR to open a JPEG and apply (create) XMP edits but eventually, you gotta use Open and burn the edits into the JPEG. No free lunch. 

ACR as a filter does this each time (applies the edits and burns them into the JPEG), again, no free lunch. 

Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Community Expert ,
Jul 03, 2022 Jul 03, 2022

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As suggested, you either work in the "true" Adobe Camera Raw plug-in on the JPEG files, creating XMP sidecar files containing the edits. Eventually, you will need to save new JPEG versions. I would suggest that you use Image Processor to batch create PSD versions so that these files are the "masters" linked to the XMP files and the new JPEG files are the derivative versions.

 

The alternative is to use the Camera Raw Filter inside Photoshop. Here the only real option is to use a smart object. Although you could use History Log to metadata to capture edits, that isn't non-destructive. Again I would use Image Processor to create PSD versions, however, I would add an action to convert the Background image layer to a smart object layer.

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Community Expert ,
Jul 04, 2022 Jul 04, 2022

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Yes, I think Stephen has the actual "correct" answer here: If you're going to do further work on a jpeg, save it as a PSD or TIIF immediately.

 

It's easy get lost in details and miss the big picture 😉

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