• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers
Exit
4

Looking for tips on color correcting this yellowed oil painting

Participant ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Happy new year, hive mind! I have a question.

I'm a fan of George Inness and am trying to see what this painting would have looked like before the ravages of time made it so gloomy 🙂  

My impulse was to go to adjust brightness and contrast, levels, and hue/saturation — but the results were disappointing—more legible but it seems really washed out. (See my file below with non destructive adjustment layers)

Any thoughts on a systematic way to do corrections like this?

Thanks in advance.


TOPICS
macOS

Views

893

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

corrected_2L.jpg

 

The problem with the original is the blue channel. It's clipped to the point where there's no information left:

blue.jpg

 

The lack of blue channel information is what gives the heavy yellow cast. To fix it here, I had to borrow some from the other channels, with a Channel Mixer layer. Use Blend If to constrain it to the low end of the underlying blue channel. Note - the proper fix would be to go back to the raw file and retrieve as much blue channel information as possible there.

 

Then it's a simple matter of using a Levels layer to lift the blue channel and (a little less) the green channel. Just drag the high endpoint.

 

Finally Selective Color as a finishing touch, just to reduce yellow a tiny bit more.

 

histogram.png

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Participant ,
Jan 02, 2024 Jan 02, 2024

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I love this answer. What a great observation. 

I've gotten a lot of great info from the super-helpful users commenting here, so I'm not going to mark a single one correct, but identifying the blue channel as the culprit is EXTREMELY useful.

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 02, 2024 Jan 02, 2024

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You're welcome 🙂

 

In this case you can see the problem clearly in the histogram set to Colors, so you get a graph for each channel. At least for the type of work I do, the histogram is an extremely useful diagnostic tool.  If something looks wrong in the image, the histogram can often tell you exactly where the problem is.

 

Whenever you see one or more channels solidly backed up against either end, you have clipping. Clipping means data lost. That usually doesn't look good, and for photography-based work, clipping is symptomatic of a problem that needs to be fixed.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Photoshop-Noyster2-color-correction-with-Divide-result.jpg

 

Above is my result.

 

This was done using a very clever and super fast technique that I learned from some Adobe video editing teachers, where if there is a single dominant unwanted color cast in an image, it can be cancelled out in a few seconds by adding a solid color layer set to the unwanted color, and applying the Divide blending mode to it. 

 

These are the steps, also used in the Photoshop demo below:

1. Create a new Solid Color fill layer. 

2. Hide it.

3. In the Layers panel, double-click the Solid Color fill layer, and click its eyedropper on a part of the image that has the unwanted color cast. By the way, this is the reason for step 2, because if the default solid black color is not hidden, you can’t see what to click in the image. 

4. Unhide the Solid Color fill layer, now that you’ve set the color. 

5. Set the layer blending mode of the Solid Color fill layer to Divide.

6. (not shown) If you don’t like the results, you can double-click the Solid Color fill layer to adjust the sampled color.

 

The image quality is not good in the demo below because the Adobe forum software is not kind to colors in uploaded animated GIF; my original of that GIF looks fine.

 

Photoshop Noyster2 color correction with Divide.gif

 

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Participant ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

What a clever approach. Thank you.


Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

quote

This was done using a very clever and super fast technique that I learned from some Adobe video editing teachers, where if there is a single dominant unwanted color cast in an image, it can be cancelled out in a few seconds by adding a solid color layer set to the unwanted color, and applying the Divide blending mode to it. 

 


By @Conrad C

 

Thank you for sharing Conrad!

 

This reminded me a bit of the old colour cast removal technique of creating a solid fill using the inverted colour of the unwanted colour cast colour, then blending in color blend mode at around 20-30% opacity.

 

2024-01-01_12-35-33.jpg

 

This was popular before Adobe added the "Photo Filter" adjustment layer such as "Cooling Filter (82)" or using a custom colour value.

 

The results of the divide method are very different though. This is a good thing if using the "variants" approach to combine different quick corrections into one.

 

 

 

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

@Noyster2 

 

Firstly, this is very much subjective. There are of course general guides that one can use for sky, clouds, grass or foliage – this is very much a case of deciding on what your "vision" should be for the colour and contrast. I am not familiar with this artists works, so there may be a common theme that you can use as a guide.

 

One can use many different techniques, which is an excellent thing (more on this shortly).

 

Although we can discuss some of these individual techniques as @D Fosse and @Conrad C have done, I'd like to start by moving beyond individual correction methods.

 

Traditionally, one puts in as much time as commercially or practically possible in a hobby or labour of love situation when working on an image. Attempting to make a "perfect/great/good/acceptable" overall image in the allotted time.

 

When Dan Margulis introduced the "variants" concept, it changed the way that I and many others approached image editing. This workflow proposed making multiple versions, using different "fast" corrections – as opposed to spending a long time on a single series of edits.

 

Let's say that you only have 20 minutes of "budgeted time" for a correction of a particular image. The traditional approach is to spend 20 minutes on that image, making the best that you can. The "variants" approach could be to edit 2-4 different versions of the same image that take < 5 minutes each. Some attempts may be better in some areas than others. They may also be similar but subtly different. One can then intelligently combine the different images taking the best areas of each to create a composite – or one can simply average all of the variants into a new combined version. This average version could then be the final image or the starting point for further "traditional" fine-tuning.

 

Here are 7 quick variants, in no particular order or preference:

 

00007.jpg00006.jpg00005.jpg00004.jpg00003.jpg00002.jpg00001.jpg

This is what Dan termed the "Par version" – or a simple average of the variants:

combined-variants.jpg

And here is the original and the "par" version (average of all 7 variants):

side-by-side.jpg

 

You may or may not like the final "par" version, or perhaps the "par" would be better if averaged from only 2 or 3 of the variants (culling unsuitable variants). Or perhaps rather than using the "stupid blend" (the mean/average of all combined images), it would be better to layer in different opacity or blend modes and or mask and combine different areas of the variants to form a composite image.

 

Remember, the combined result can just be the starting point for further editing. In this example, in the available 20 minutes, one may spend 15 minutes making variants, then combining the "winners" and then spend the last 5 minutes fine-tuning as one may traditionally do from the original unedited image.

 

Although Dan goes into this in more detail in his books, videos and PPW PDF documentation, some freely available links on this topic include:

 

http://www.moderncolorworkflow.com/blog/the-mit-5k-dataset-3-effective-averaging-close-up

 

http://www.moderncolorworkflow.com/blog/the-mit-5k-dataset-4-more-on-averaging

 

http://www.moderncolorworkflow.com/blog/ppw-blending-strategy-in-a-flower-image

 

https://youtu.be/MdQb-iZYDro?si=c_XeYlcLWeaFUk3N

 

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Participant ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Wow! Thank you for the detailed response.  I haven't experimented much with the variants function but I'll give it more time in the future 🙂

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

quote

Wow! Thank you for the detailed response.  I haven't experimented much with the variants function but I'll give it more time in the future 🙂


By @Noyster2

 

 

There isn't a specific "variants function" in Photoshop, what is meant is that you make different corrections, then combine them.

 

Take the following 4 "variant" examples:

 

1) Using the Camera Raw Filter to "fine tune" the image using the various sliders (working on a smart object copy)

 

2) Using the method that @Conrad C proposed

 

3) Using the method that @D Fosse mentioned

 

4) Using some other series of edits to create another version.

 

So now you have 4 different corrected images, each may have pros/cons... But by combining them in different ways – "the whole is greater than the sum of its parts".

 

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 31, 2023 Dec 31, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I upvoted your post just for bringing up Dan Margulis. I’ve been concerned that the valuable body of Photoshop color correction wisdom from 15-20 years ago, by teachers such as Dan Margulis and Bruce Fraser, may not be known to newer students and professionals.

 

Many of their books and print magazine articles may be harder to find now, but their insights and techniques should definitely be carried forward. And for those of you who want to learn a lot more about color, if you have not heard of Dan and Bruce, you should seek out their books and articles.

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 02, 2024 Jan 02, 2024

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Opening image with Camera Raw and Auto correction doesn't work so bad…

Capture d’écran 2024-01-02 à 21.44.19.png

If not I would use curvbes and set up of white and black point…

Votes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines