Save as - 'embed pro photo colour profile' is this new?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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So I have just upgraded to a M1 chip mac and an LG monitor and have the latest updated photoshop 2022 installed. I shoot product and when I am saving as, instead of the usual 'embed to sRGB colour profile' it's not saying 'embed to Pro Photo colour profile' and I'm very confused. I can't figure out how to change it to sRGB or if I need to? I shoot product imagery for web and the occasional for print. It;s been a long time since I had to change any settings but since getting new everythoing I'm so lost! 

Any help would be greatly appreciated! 

 

 

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Community Expert , Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

Yes, PEC is right. This is set in Lightroom Preferences > External Editing.

 

The profile set there is embedded in the file and honored in Photoshop. It will override the working space in Photoshop, as it should.

 

For some reason ProPhoto is the default in Lightroom. That's an extremely bad choice of default IMO, since defaults are supposed to be safe settings for beginners. But ProPhoto is strictly for advanced users who understand all the implications. Those who need or want ProPhoto will kno

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Community Expert ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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What are Photoshop’s Edit > Color Settings? 

How and in which application did you develop the images? 

 

If they originally have ProPhoto as the embedded ICC Profile then the behaviour would seem as intended. 

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Community Expert ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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Hello, as C.Pfaffenbichler, I think that you should look at the export settings of Lightroom, if that is how you import the images in Photoshop.

Likewise, at the bottom of Camera Raw's interface, you can select the profile and bit depth (I'd double check that as it makes more sense to use PPRGB in 16 bits than in 8...) 

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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AWESOME, THANK YOU!

 

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Community Expert ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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Yes, PEC is right. This is set in Lightroom Preferences > External Editing.

 

The profile set there is embedded in the file and honored in Photoshop. It will override the working space in Photoshop, as it should.

 

For some reason ProPhoto is the default in Lightroom. That's an extremely bad choice of default IMO, since defaults are supposed to be safe settings for beginners. But ProPhoto is strictly for advanced users who understand all the implications. Those who need or want ProPhoto will know perfectly well how to get it without the help of a default setting.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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THANK YOU!!! 

 

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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So silly question, should it be sRGB or Adobe RGB? 

and 16 bits or 8? Resolution is 240, I think I remember it used to be 300? 

 

Apologies for the questions, I haven't had to change anything for 13 years! ha

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Community Expert ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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Do you work for print ot web and animation? 

Working on 16bit has advantages (and a price in performance and size) but even though 8bit is appropriate for the final images one delivers.  

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Community Expert ,
Aug 22, 2022 Aug 22, 2022

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If you work for web, sRGB is always the safe choice. In the printing industry, Adobe RGB is the de facto standard.

 

For web and screen, ppi is irrelevant and doesn't matter. If you send out files for print, most people expect 300. Ppi is a measure of pixel density on paper (and hence printed size).

 

You probably want to send files as 16 bit from Lightroom to Photoshop, just to have some extra latitude for editing. 8 bit files can easily break up in color banding with extensive editing. But for web (and final delivery for print) 8 bit is usually sufficient.

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