Why Should I Save Flattened PSD Files?

Participant ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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I want to preface this by saying that I've been using Photoshop since it was distributed by Aldus (so a little while now), and I feel like I should know the answer to this, but …

 

Is there some reason why I should keep a file in PSD format after flattening it, as opposed to a compressed TIFF?

 

The reason why I ask this is that I receive flattened PSDs from customers all the time, and it seems like it would make more sense to save as compressed TIFF, at about half the file size. I completely understand saving a layered file as a PSD, although admittedly, it seems like this could also be saved as a TIFF, since layered TIFFs are supported in almost all modern layout programs.

 

I feel like I'm going to feel so dumb when someone gives me the answer on this, but please enlighten me …

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Guide ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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No, there's not a specific reason to save as a .psd with flattened images. A .tiff is more than fine and won't change the image in any way.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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@claidheamdanns wrote:

I want to preface this by saying that I've been using Photoshop since it was distributed by Aldus…


 

This is not what you are asking, but are you thinking of Aldus PageMaker? Aldus also had FreeHand, PhotoStyler, and SuperPaint, but never Photoshop. A complete list of their applications is here:  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldus_Corporation

 

Photoshop was developed in 1987 by the American brothers Thomas and John Knoll, who sold the distribution license to Adobe in 1988. 

 

Jane

 

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Participant ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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Before Adobe bought all of Aldus' programs, Aldus employees had an option to get Photoshop free (or almost free — I forget which). It was part of a cross-promotional opportunity for what would later become the suite of apps. My best friend's then wife worked for Aldus, and they gave me Photoshop, Illustrator and PageMaker — all in Aldus packaging. 

Incidently, I had written my own drawing app before the brothers made Photoshop, but I was so happy when they wrote their app, because it did everything my app could do, plus the things I wished I could figure out, but couldn't. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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I was using Photostyler, and after Adobe acquired Aldus, they sent me a CD-ROM of Photoshop 3.0, and a couple of weeks later, a copy of Photoshop 4.0.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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@claidheamdanns 

 

Interesting piece of history — thanks for sharing! And very cool that you had written your own drawing app — they should have brought you and your expertise on board!

 

And I agree on the flattened psd vs tiff discussion. I can't tell you why your customers might do it.

 

Jane

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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Indeed, Photoshop was never part of Aldus.

As to PSD vs. TIFF, there's no reason to be using PSD instead; and I'm not sure why you'd flatten anyway.

Anyway, see: http://digitaldog.net/files/TIFFvsPSD.pdf


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Participant ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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Please see my explanation in response to Jane. Not officially part of Aldus. It was an employee option. 

But, anyway, I'm with you. flattening a PSD file just leaves me scratching my head. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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If you are receiving a flattened .psd file and you save as a tiff. Then there is no reason to save the .psd file. If it is a proper .psd file it would have layers and that would be the reason to keep the .psd file. So if in the future you need to make a change.

Lee- Graphic Designer, Print Specialist, Photographer

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Participant ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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Yeah, but I'm not saving as a TIFF. I'm receiving in from clients flattened PSD files. I'm not altering them, just dropping them into our InDesign templates AS IS. 

It was more a question of curiosity, as in: "Why on earth would someone save a flattened PSD files?"

 

Some clients are receptive to suggestions about changes in their process, others are not. We work with what we are given. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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quote

Yeah, but I'm not saving as a TIFF. I'm receiving in from clients flattened PSD files. I'm not altering them, just dropping them into our InDesign templates AS IS. 

It was more a question of curiosity, as in: "Why on earth would someone save a flattened PSD files?"

By @claidheamdanns

 

We volunteer's posting here can't answer that question, as 'them'.

This is a user-to-user support forum and speculating isn't really why we're here posting.

Your question was "Why should I save a flattened TIFF".After and formatted in bold: "Is there some reason why I should keep a file in PSD format after flattening it, as opposed to a compressed TIFF?"

That question was answered.

quote

Some clients are receptive to suggestions about changes in their process, others are not. We work with what we are given.

By @claidheamdanns

Then no matter what answer you got, sounds like you keep working with what you're given.....


Author “Color Management for Photographers" & "Photoshop CC Color Management/pluralsight"

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 11, 2022 Apr 11, 2022

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Many people don't know fully understand file formats. PSD is the default format so that's what they go with. If you switch back and forth between having layers and not having them, PSD will work without thought and without having an extra dialog of options (which many people don't understand). So PSD is just simpler, and it works across Adobe apps. Sure a compressed TIFF will be smaller, but many people don't know that and the warning about reduced compability can scare people off if they don't understand whether it affects them or not.


— Adobe Certified Expert & Instructor at Noble Desktop | Web Developer, Designer, InDesign Scriptor

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022

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So the quetion basically boils down to compression or no compression.

 

Personally I never compress, because I tend to work with large files, and compression dramatically increases save and open times, like from fifteen seconds to three minutes. I don't worry about file sizes - when disks are full I get bigger ones.

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